🩴 🏃 Running| Running with Sandals/Flip-flops/Thongs

I often see long distance runners wearing this kind of flip-flops:
image

I’ve tried it a couple of times, but my feet keep slipping (especially when I sweat or when it’s raining). Is there a special technique for running with them? Or socks that help the sandal to stay in place?
Should I switch to this kind of closed flip-flop instead?

I like the idea of running with sandals because I am already used to run in Vibram fivefingers, but sandals seem better suited to the rain and humidity. I would appreciate any help or advice from other runners in the forum. :blush:

Running with sandals works best if you’re unshaven and wearing a backpack.

4 Likes

I often run with a backpack, but I’m female and cannot grow a beard :sweat_smile:

This is something I’ve seen several times and never understood it. It has to hurt your feet. I could consider other options like running barefoot (you see quite a few people doing it), but flip flops? no way.

You’re a woman? I don’t know why I thought I knew you were a guy!

3 Likes

I am also completely bamboozled regarding how people can (seemingly comfortably, efficiently) run in flip-flops/sandals.

I am all for running with minimalist shoes (I love my cheap, light-as-air FUFA shoes I use on my weekly runs), but I thought flip-flops were really bad for your feet and could cause problems just through extensive casual use? Maybe there are special brands that are engineered to fix this issue?

2 Likes

I’ve only seen it in Taiwan…when I was in high school I did Cross Country and Track and would often join community group runs/events or group runs the local running shops would organize and I’ve never seen anyone wear those flip-flops that are so popular in Taiwan.

On that note though…I don’t think I’ve ever noticed any legit running specialty shops/stores here. Only one I know of is the Asic’s store in Taipei, but in Taichung I can’t think of any…I just buy my stuff online.

1 Like

Walking in them in the rain is a learned skill as it is

3 Likes

They look similar to the shoes described in ‘born to run,’ where Mexican endurance runners wear little more than strips of rubber, tied up with twine.

Running shoes are always a head scratcher to me. Are they needed? Do they contribute to making your body better or worse? Are Hoka running shoes not cheating? I run. Quite a lot. ( I recently completed the Brighton marathon and took part in a 48 hour endurance run around the green belt area of London.) I find that runners talk about their shoes a lot.

For me out boils down to… do these shoes give me blisters? That’s really the only question I ask myself.

I would run in whatever makes your feet feel comfy when you run. Those plastic jobbies look like they won’t be comfy to run in.

1 Like

They talk about pronation, overpronation and supination. I personally don’t know how much this is marketing bullshit, but reportedly it isn’t. And maybe it isn’t.

Then you have the cushion. If you haven’t had any knee issues caused by running, I’m happy for you, but many others go through a lot of recurrent issues.

And then… this:

2 Likes

This is so true! Runners love buying new shoes and talking about them. Ironically, one of the things I love about running is that it really “low friction”: you just need to go out, put on your shoes, and move your legs. But somehow, lots of us keep overthinking on ways to make the experience more comfortable.

I think I will stick with my froggy toe shoes then. :sweat_smile:

3 Likes

It’s one of those things that I can’t get in to. Chatting about energy gels etc also not on my radar.

I’ve never run in those, but truly they are the gold standard for running. Almost as nature intended. My hat is off to you for running in skin shoes.

It’s marketing bullshit. We are nomadic apes, evolved to run across large sections of land. Probably not for 60 or 70 years, like science now enables us to do, but certainly we evolved naked and outdoors.

2 Likes

Yeah, fuck that and fuck those. I never use them. I refuse to do it even when they’re handed to me for free. I even make my own energy drinks, occasionally xD

Yeah, well, what can I say. I spend a lot of time naked and a lot of time outdoors. But hey… before you call the police…

5 Likes

When jogging distance, the limiting factor for me is the bones in my feet hurting. I’m often tempted by these squishy flops, but I cannot imagine the effort of keeping them on my feet wouldn’t rub them raw.

I’ll try it and report back, but I need to buy new ones; my mom stole my squishy flops.

2 Likes

Ohh, you mentioned on your Shimen-Pindong walk thread that your feet ended up hurting for years after you finished. Did you use “normal” running shoes or any kind of special footwear for your impressive feat? (BTW, your topic got me motivated to do more long distance running/walking across Taiwan!)

1 Like

Please don’t do it in the ugly side of the island as she did for no apparent reason.

1 Like

Actually, the flops my mom took are the ones I broke down and bought at the end of my trip. I started out with Swedish On shoes. I’ve had about four pair of those and that is what I still jog in now.
Without the flops, I wouldn’t have been able to finish. Concrete and a heavy pack killed my feet.

1 Like

Safety!

1 Like

I use them for marathons and training for distance, every four miles. Tomorrow I’m doing a chatty half marathon (round Little Marlow, it is gorgeous) with friends and won’t bother with a gel as I won’t be pushing myself.

1 Like

If your idea of safety is to become a rug under a 50 ton truck…

I thought a runner would provide some insight into why those flip-flops are so often used in Taiwan. I wear a very thick shoe. Nikes but they look a bit like Hokas. And I run mostly uphill and walk down the mountain. My knees can’t handle several runs per week on flat ground anymore. I’m actually headed up the mountain soon. My dog is pacing back and forth because he knows its not a workday and the mountain is what we do on these days.

2 Likes