Russian Nuclear sub accident

Russian Accident

Monday is going to be very interesting. What will the O administration have to say about this, especially after Putin is puting
out a test, I mean, a feeler on how O stands on putting nukes in Poland?

How will Bush step up to the plate on this one. Stay tune kids, the next 70 days will be interesting…

[quote=“Namahottie”]Russian Accident

Monday is going to be very interesting. What will the O administration have to say about this, especially after Putin is puting
out a test, I mean, a feeler on how O stands on putting nukes in Poland?

How will Bush step up to the plate on this one. Stay tune kids, the next 70 days will be interesting…[/quote]

Why would they saying anything other than “Condolances” Accidents in the military happen.

[quote=“Namahottie”]Russian Accident

Monday is going to be very interesting. What will the O administration have to say about this, especially after Putin is puting
out a test, I mean, a feeler on how O stands on putting nukes in Poland?

How will Bush step up to the plate on this one. Stay tune kids, the next 70 days will be interesting…[/quote]
Sorry, but I don’t see how the tragic death of twenty people on a nuclear-powered submarine destined for lease to India relates to what you’re talking about.

Joesax, you probably right. My thought is that it’s a nuke sub, and was armed. I guess I didn’t read it right.

one small mercy: if it was a halon firecontrol system like i suspect it was (weight and efficiency wise, the best fire control systems by far, especially with sensitive electronic equipment) then those who died would have felt no pain… these chemicals are almost all anaesthetic gasses as well as being fire supressant (just like chloroform, much better than ether from the fire danger in theatres point of view).

it was Freon gas apparently…

[quote]Investigators said the deaths were caused by suffocation after Freon gas was released following activation of the submarine’s fire safety system. He added that those working in the area that had donned breathing apparatus had survived, while those who failed to use safety equipment had all perished. Gennady Illarionov, a former naval submariner, told RIA Novosti, “You can’t rule out that some of the civilians had not been issued with portable breathing apparatus or didn’t know how to use them,”

And a high-ranking source at the Pacific Fleet’s headquarters also questioned why portable breathing apparatus had not been used, “Perhaps the submariners did not notice the gas being released and when they realized it was already too late.”[/quote]

[quote]FREON INHALATION:

Vapor is heavier than air and can cause suffocation by reducing
oxygen available for breathing. Breathing high concentrations of
vapor may cause light-headedness, giddiness, shortness of breath,
and may lead to narcosis, cardiac irregularities, unconsciousness
or death. Trichlorotrifluoroethane - LC50 Rats 52,000 ppm/4 hrs.

http://www.hazard.com/msds/mf/ems/files/71000.html

[/quote]

not the worst way to go, but still… RIP…

All I can say is if the Russian navy assigned me to sub duty, it might be time to seriously consider going AWOL. Sounds like a crappy way to go to me, trapped in a tincan deep below the sea.

Submarines, shockers. My grandfather was in the British Navy, gunnery officer on a sub during the last states of World War II and the subsequent cleanup. Never wanted to discuss it in any kind of detail.

umm, Freon is a general term for a variety of hydroflurocarbons that are also called Halon.

neither Halon or Freon are proper chemical names, they are simple names for lay persons (because why do you want to have to say “a mixture of 1,1,2-trifluoro-2,3-dichloro-isopropane and 1,1-dichloro-2,3-difluoro-propane” when Freon (or Halon) and the appropriate code number is faster and a lot easer to spell). Halon is more commonly used when the application is fire suppression, Freon when the application is circuit board and chip wafer washing.

well duh… obviously I was posting with the layperson in mind, ordinarily you wouldn’t catch me dead using some limp wristed abbreviation when talking about “a mixture of 1,1,2-trifluoro-2,3-dichloro-isopropane and 1,1-dichloro-2,3-difluoro-propane” but since the article in question referred to “a mixture of 1,1,2-trifluoro-2,3-dichloro-isopropane and 1,1-dichloro-2,3-difluoro-propane” I thought I’d just point out what breathing “a mixture of 1,1,2-trifluoro-2,3-dichloro-isopropane and 1,1-dichloro-2,3-difluoro-propane” might do to you… As you can see it’s nasty stuff that “mixture of 1,1,2-trifluoro-2,3-dichloro-isopropane and 1,1-dichloro-2,3-difluoro-propane”… :wink: :beatnik: