Taiwan Wildflowers and Weeds

Litsea cubeba, known as maqaw by the Atayal.

Litsea cubeba, known as maqaw by the Atayal.[/quote]
Correct. I give them a wash and dry and put them in the oven at very low temperature with the door cracked open a wee bit. They turn out like little black peppercorns and you grind them in the same way. They’re lovely and lemony, with a little touch of the tongue numbness you get off good sichuan peppers. Works great with fish and chicken.

That’d be cool, thanks! I believe indigo doesn’t turn blue until it oxidizes (just got some, but haven’t had time to try it), and it’s a great dye, so I wonder whether those berries contain a similar compound?

Bidens pilosa is also used as a natural dye in East Africa.

Hey wasnt there a thread bout “biting dog” and “biting cat” . Two dangerous plants found on Taiwan that you need to avoid? Wheres that thread. Watch out for them suckers.

Yeah, here’s the thread:

Dog’s_Breakfast gave the Chinese names and posted pictures of the two plants.

This is a great thread. I’m completely in the dark about these kinds of things.

[quote=“Mark Nagel”]I was hiking yesterday in a large wooded area of trees and weeds in northern Miaoli County, and I noticed that there were beautiful purple flowers everywhere I looked. Here’s a picture that I took:

The flowers grew on long tangled vines and they always had five petals. Also, the leaves on the vine were always five leaves attached together.

I’m curious to know the English name and the Chinese name of these flowers. If anyone knows what kind of flowers these are, please let me know.[/quote]

look a bit like morning glory

[quote=“fenlander”][quote=“Mark Nagel”]I was hiking yesterday in a large wooded area of trees and weeds in northern Miaoli County, and I noticed that there were beautiful purple flowers everywhere I looked. Here’s a picture that I took:

The flowers grew on long tangled vines and they always had five petals. Also, the leaves on the vine were always five leaves attached together.

I’m curious to know the English name and the Chinese name of these flowers. If anyone knows what kind of flowers these are, please let me know.[/quote]

look a bit like morning glory[/quote]
Looks like someone had a VERY merry Christmas! :laughing:

[quote=“sandman”][quote=“fenlander”][quote=“Mark Nagel”]I was hiking yesterday in a large wooded area of trees and weeds in northern Miaoli County, and I noticed that there were beautiful purple flowers everywhere I looked. Here’s a picture that I took:

The flowers grew on long tangled vines and they always had five petals. Also, the leaves on the vine were always five leaves attached together.

I’m curious to know the English name and the Chinese name of these flowers. If anyone knows what kind of flowers these are, please let me know.[/quote]

look a bit like morning glory[/quote]
Looks like someone had a VERY merry Christmas! :laughing:[/quote]

What’s the story?

[quote=“sandman”][quote=“fenlander”][quote=“Mark Nagel”]I was hiking yesterday in a large wooded area of trees and weeds in northern Miaoli County, and I noticed that there were beautiful purple flowers everywhere I looked. Here’s a picture that I took:

The flowers grew on long tangled vines and they always had five petals. Also, the leaves on the vine were always five leaves attached together.

I’m curious to know the English name and the Chinese name of these flowers. If anyone knows what kind of flowers these are, please let me know.[/quote]

look a bit like morning glory[/quote]
Looks like someone had a VERY merry Christmas! :laughing:[/quote]

Come on Sandman for the untrained eye they do look a bit similar!!!

Now get on and write a book about Taiwan wild flowers Mr Sandman as I want to read it in English, can u include some with medicinal properties too?

ah ok I read the whole thread now.

so that is Morning glory. :popcorn: sorry going too fast my brain cant keep up.

[quote=“Dragonbones”]I’m interested in learning to identify local plants and flowers that can be used for dyeing wool, cotton, silk and linen. I know how to handle mordants and the like; I just need to find the plants locally, and preferably free for the gathering, rather than importing madder root etc…

I haven’t had time to start my homework on this one yet, but just thought I’d throw the topic out there, since we already have this thread, to see if anyone knows this kind of stuff. :pray:[/quote]

At the 24 hour Eslite on Dunhua I have seen a series of books on useful plants in Taiwan. I recal one for sure on edible plants and I vaguely recal one used for industrial purposes which I assume would include dyes.

Beyond that I would head to the handicraft centre near CKS memorial and look for the hand dyed stuff there. There are a few village coops that have restarted traditional dying and would be the logical places to contact about this.

Apparently Sanxia has an indigo dyeing handicrafts cottage industry.

This morning I went for a walk, and I came across a few more unidentified wildflowers. I saw lots of these yellow flowers:

I also saw some different yellow flowers which were much smaller and only had five petals, and they were part of a plant which looked similar to clovers, except that each of the three leaves was partially split in two:

Also, I saw a bunch of very tiny bluish-purple flowers:

(I know that the flowers in that picture are a little blurry, but the diameter of each flower was only about 3 or 4 mm, so it was very hard to get a clear picture.)

Also, I saw some Lantana that were different colors than the ones that I saw last week. (The ones I saw last week are on Page 1 of this thread.) The Lantana that I saw last week were red, orange, and yellow, but today I saw some Lantana that was pink ones mixed with yellow ones. Look at this:

And this Lantana has flowers which are light purple, but yellow in the center, which looks kind of strange:

Also, today I took a close up of a Bidens pilosa, which is the most common wildflower in Taiwan. This picture looks much better than the picture that I posted on Page 2 of this thread:

Does anyone know the English name for Bidens pilosa? (It is not a daisy.)

Dude! Google!

[quote] * Afrikaans: knapsekêrel (from Kaapse kerwel, literally “Cape Chervil”)Also, Black Jack.
* Bontoc: nguad, puriket
* English: broomstick, broom stuff, cobbler’s pegs, devil’s needles, Spanish needle. Known in Australia as farmers friends, pitchforks
* Fijian: batimadramadra, matakaro, matua kamate, mbatikalawau
* Filipino: pisau-pisau
* French: bident hérissé, herbe d’aiguille, herbe villebague, piquants noirs
* Hawaiʻian: kī, kī nehe, kī pipili, nehe
* Ibatan: dadayem
* Japanese: ko-sendangusa
* Maori (Cook Islands): kamika tuarongo, nīroa, piripiri, piripiri kerekere, piripiri nīroa
* Niuean: kofetoga (=Tongan bamboo, i.e.: junk bamboo)
* Futunan: tae puaka (“pig shit”)
* Pukapukan: pilipili
* Portuguese: picão preto
* Spanish: acetillo, amor seco, arponcito, asta de cabra, bidente piloso, cacho de cabra, cadillo, hierba amarilla, masquia, mazote, papunga chipaca, pega-pega, perca, rosilla, sirvulaca
* Tahitian: piripiri (=sticker)
* Taiwan: xian feng cao (Chinese: 咸豐草)
* Tongan: fisi‘uli (=black flower)
[/quote]

[quote=“Mark Nagel”]I also saw some different yellow flowers which were much smaller and only had five petals, and they were part of a plant which looked similar to clovers, except that each of the three leaves was partially split in two:

[/quote]
This looks like Oxalis or wood sorrel.

Spanish Needle ( in the US [south] and the Caribbean).

Chris, thanks a lot! I’m sure that you are right that it is Wood Sorrel (Oxalis) because I Googled it after you told me about it. However, I can’t tell whether it’s Oxalis stricta or Oxalis dillenii. Do you know which one it is?

About the other yellow flower: I think it might be “Cats Ear” (Hypochaeris radicata), but that’s just a guess based on comparing it with lots of pictures of flowers that I have found on the internet. Please correct me if I’m wrong.

Wookiee, thanks for telling me that the white flowers which are ubiquitous in Taiwan are called “Spanish Needles”.

By the way, does anyone know the Chinese names for any of these flowers?

[quote=“sandman”]Dude! Google!

[quote] * Afrikaans: knapsekêrel (from Kaapse kerwel, literally “Cape Chervil”)Also, Black Jack.
* Bontoc: nguad, puriket
* English: broomstick, broom stuff, cobbler’s pegs, devil’s needles, Spanish needle. Known in Australia as farmers friends, pitchforks
* Fijian: batimadramadra, matakaro, matua kamate, mbatikalawau
* Filipino: pisau-pisau
* French: bident hérissé, herbe d’aiguille, herbe villebague, piquants noirs
* Hawaiʻian: kī, kī nehe, kī pipili, nehe
* Ibatan: dadayem
* Japanese: ko-sendangusa
* Maori (Cook Islands): kamika tuarongo, nīroa, piripiri, piripiri kerekere, piripiri nīroa
* Niuean: kofetoga (=Tongan bamboo, i.e.: junk bamboo)
* Futunan: tae puaka (“pig shit”)
* Pukapukan: pilipili
* Portuguese: picão preto
* Spanish: acetillo, amor seco, arponcito, asta de cabra, bidente piloso, cacho de cabra, cadillo, hierba amarilla, masquia, mazote, papunga chipaca, pega-pega, perca, rosilla, sirvulaca
* Tahitian: piripiri (=sticker)
*
Taiwan: xian feng cao (Chinese: 咸豐草)

* Tongan: fisi‘uli (=black flower)
[/quote][/quote]
Dude! Like, DUDE! :laughing:

Sandman,

I know that you already told me about Spanish Needles, but how about all of the other flowers?

By the way, the Wikipedia article that you quoted didn’t mention the tones of “xian feng cao”, so I looked up the characters. I found out that the correct pronunciation is xiánfēng cǎo.

Mark