Taiwan Wildflowers and Weeds

I was hiking yesterday in a large wooded area of trees and weeds in northern Miaoli County, and I noticed that there were beautiful purple flowers everywhere I looked. Here’s a picture that I took:

The flowers grew on long tangled vines and they always had five petals. Also, the leaves on the vine were always five leaves attached together.

I’m curious to know the English name and the Chinese name of these flowers. If anyone knows what kind of flowers these are, please let me know.

Convolvulous.

Common as muck them, the floral equivalent of the Sparrow. Lousy weeds - I dig them out of the farm on sight, and taunt them for good measure.

The common name is Morning Glory (please, keep it clean, especially on the eve of a sacred celebration).

Yes, I’m on the Xmas sauce.

[quote]The common name is Morning Glory (please, keep it clean, especially on the eve of a sacred celebration).
[/quote]
Almas John pulling out his morning glory and taunting it? “Come on and have a go if you think you’re hard enough!”

I’m a heathen.

Can’t you get a serious buzz from the seeds of those things? Like strychnine poisoning or summat?

[quote=“sandman”][quote]The common name is Morning Glory (please, keep it clean, especially on the eve of a sacred celebration).
[/quote]
Almas John pulling out his morning glory and taunting it? “Come on and have a go if you think you’re hard enough!”

I’m a heathen.[/quote]
:slight_smile: Oh, you are awful! But I do like you.
Regarding the Morning Glory (of the vine kind) I learnt something new in the recent Canadian Drug Fiends thread thanks to a post by the Tainan Cowboy. Morning Glory seeds can be used for nefarious purposes - when chewed in large quantities they give a mild LSD high. Devil weed!!

Now, where’s my bottle?

The seed from almas john’s morning glory.

Thanks a lot. And here’s another wildflower that I see all the time here in Miaoli County:

Does anyone know the name for this one?

[quote=“Mark Nagel”]Thanks a lot. And here’s another wildflower that I see all the time here in Miaoli County:

Does anyone know the name for this one?[/quote]
God, an equally bad weed, Lantana http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lantana

Edit: The thread title “wildflowers” should be changed to “invasive weeds.”

That one is also very common, but I don;t know the name. I only do veggies and shrooms.

In Changhua county the sow the rice fields in winter with flowers. It looks quite nice come spring and makes the place seem reasonably livable.

[quote=“Okami”]
In Changhua county the sow the rice fields in winter with flowers. It looks quite nice come spring and makes the place seem reasonably livable.[/quote]

this is in Miaoli county.

Thanks a lot, Almas John. That’s two mysteries solved. I don’t regard them as weeds. I regard them as wildflowers. One man’s trash is another man’s treasure.

I also often come across a strange plant that has tiny fern-like leaves which are so sensitive that if you touch any of the leaves, then all of the tiny leaves on that stem close up and stay closed for about 2 or 3 minutes. Here’s a picture of a whole patch of the “sensitive plant”:

And here’s a close up of one of them:

Does this plant have a name, other than just calling it the “sensitive plant”?

one of several species of Mimosa. Perhaps a prostrate mimosa, like Mimosa strigillosa, or the larger Mimosa pudica or Mimosa sensitiva. None native to Taiwan as far as I know.

Another choice is Chamberbitter (Phyllanthus urinaria). The true Mimosas have small purple pom-pom type flowers, the niruri or chamber bitter has greenish white, minute flowers that appear at axils of the leaves, with the seed capsules found under the leaves. The leaves are also sensitive.

The presence of thorns on the previous photo makes me think of a true Mimosa instead.

Mimosa pudica - I don’t know the common name. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mimosa_pudica

As for liking weeds, yes, many are pretty but they are bad for the environment - decrease biodiversity greatly, not just by replacing local flora but also affect the fauna.

Urodacus and Almas John, thank you very much for identifying the “sensitive plant”! I’m surprised that they aren’t native to Taiwan because I have seen them all over the west coast of Taiwan, and they’re probably on the east coast, too.

Also there’s a wild plant that looks like wheat. It’s all over the place here in Miaoli County, but it isn’t as common south of Taizhong. I don’t know if it ever has flowers because I always just see a brown stalk with lots of seed pods at the top. Here’s a picture:

Does anyone know the name for this wild plant?

By the way, I have changed the title of this thread from “Taiwan Wildflowers” to “Taiwan Wildflowers and Weeds”.

Silvergrass (Miscanthus spp.)

Morning Glory (Ipomoea spp.)

Thanks a lot, Chris! Another mystery solved!

Here’s the last one for today:

This wildflower / weed is as ubiquitous in Taiwan as clovers in America. It’s everywhere!

I have always thought this was a daisy, but then I noticed that the petal arrangement is very different from daisies which are in Europe and North America. Look at a picture of a European daisy here (Bellis perennis):

You can see that the European daisy has about 30 or 40 petals, but the “Taiwanese daisy” always has only 5 petals. Also, the leaves are different, too. So now I’m confused about whether or not the “Taiwanese daisy” is really a daisy.

[quote=“Mark Nagel”]Thanks a lot, Chris! Another mystery solved!

Here’s the last one for today:


[/quote]
Bidens pilosa, a kind of aster

Then again, daisies, chrysanthemums and sunflowers are also asters.

In Taiwan that’s most likely to be Bidens pilosa a plant with several significant Chinese medicine uses (and now shown to be a potential anticancer drug).

In Europe, that would be Bidens alba.

Both have horrible little black seeds with two teeth that cling to clothes, etc.

Damn you’re fast, Chris.