Taiwanese Professions That Earn Very High Incomes

What are the professions that earn high incomes in Taiwan?

I’ll just take a guess:

1.) Lawyers
2.) International businessman
3.) Doctor
4.) TV presenter

Any more ideas or infomation?

TV presenters don’t earn a lot unless they get their tits published regularly in Apple Daily. Acquaintance of mine is a well-known newsreader who earns about the same as me, and I’m just a crummy engineer.

I get the feeling mafia businesses (legit businesses with shady connections) are the most reliable way to get rich - as opposed to just making a good living. Loan-sharking, especially for gambling purposes, is also very profitable.

Then there’s public officaldom, of course. Bai tuo, bai tuo.

I hear the noodle stands can do quite well.

What I love about Taiwan is the potential. Of course, the visa thing makes it impossible to tap that, but if you do your time (or marry), then the market place is wide open. A good idea and some elbow grease and one has unlimited potentiality.

Taiwan. It’s the new black.

The highest professional income (not business) is international pilot: 175,000 followed by a doctor at 118,000 and petroleum and natural gas engineers at 85,000. Of course there are many English teachers who make more than all these.

accountants can make over 100K PCM with damn good bonuses of 12-24 months salary.

Ah, thank you for the information. Interesting to see where English teaching fits in.

Actors for Taiwanese or mainland TV series also make a lot of money. One example I heard from a neighbor whose son works as such an actor is 700K for the filming of one one-hour episode. And the guy has about 90 episodes to shoot in total. Sounds lucrative to me.

Marketing chemicals for a foreign chemical company yields over $100K.
Foreigners don’t make much money in the grand scheme of things.

Politicians … most of the earnings is of unknown origin tho … oh! president of Taiwan 800,000 NT$/month … but then, politician is probably not a profession …

That’s about right for pilots, in Taiwan, many are leaving for better offers so they may be increasing it. For a doctor the scale is low I believe, the variation would be huge if you include public/private/scale/own clinic etc. My impression is many would earn up to 200k NTD/mth. Professors 75k-200k per month.

There are a lot of high earners in the science parks, higher up managers and talented engineers make a lot compared to the minions, 200k+ NTD/mth? Stock options and bonuses can play a big part there. There’s a fair amount of undeclared income due to corruption/tax evasion in Taiwan so you cannot completely trust figures. Doctors sometimes take hong baos or make a cut from prescribed drugs, double job. Politicians probably make 10-100X their declared income from taking a cut on development projects. Police often double their income from backhanders.

Income for media and entertainment types can be massive due to demand from China and the fact that they can be paid a 100,000s to millions of NTD just to compere an end of year party, you have to be ‘hong’ though, if you are not ‘hong’ in Taiwan or China you will be appearing on those chat shows for 3000 NTD per show.

Don’t be suckered to comparing teaching English to other professions here, salaries are bad in Taiwan and as I said they have undeclared gigs going on.

I think I want to be a postman! (:

worldsalaries.org/taiwan.shtml

[quote=“pqkdzrwt”]I think I want to be a postman! (:

worldsalaries.org/taiwan.shtml[/quote]

I didn’t see english teacher on that list.

English teaching one of the better jobs you can have it seems. No wonder there is so many south africans here.

Many English teachers? Many? I’d like to meet them. I’ve only ever met a few, and they’ve perhaps been 5% of English teachers I’ve met here, if that. The highest I’ve ever heard of was 140,000NTD/month, but he was working 40+ hours/week, including quite a few privates.

If a teacher gets 650NTD/hour and works 30 hours per week (which would be hard in this market), at 4.3 weeks/month, before tax, he will get 83,850NTD/month.

The average teacher here has probably been here for less than two years and so probably gets something closer to 600NTD/hour these days and struggles to get 20 hours/month. At 4.3 weeks/month, that’s 51,600NTD/month (gross).

English teaching is not even in the same ball park as those figures posted above. Sure, there are a handful of guys doing really sweet gigs out there or running their own successful buxibans who earn more than 85,000NTD/month, but so what? There are doctors running their own practices too who probably earn a great deal more than 118,000NTD/month.

[quote=“GuyInTaiwan”]
English teaching is not even in the same ball park as those figures posted above. Sure, there are a handful of guys doing really sweet gigs out there or running their own successful buxibans who earn more than 85,000NTD/month, but so what? There are doctors running their own practices too who probably earn a great deal more than 118,000NTD/month.[/quote]
It is (was?) if you teach kindy. I cleared about 80k by the time I left and I had plenty of room to grow. If I chose to sub I could clear 100k, with no privates. I was considering doing software development in Taiwan until I learned I was earning way more teaching English that writing code.

English teaching is pay per hour, unpaid holidays,unstable, doesn’t match up. Any IT professionals I know can make a lot more than the average English teacher, again I wouldn’t benchmark against Taiwanese IT people, especially as you can get projects from overseas.

naijeru: What was your average hourly rate though? I posit that the average English teacher has been here for only a couple of years and has probably hit a cap of about 650NTD/hour. The days of being able to easily find gigs paying more than that in large enough blocks of hours are long gone. To be getting 100,000NTD/month at that rate, someone would need to be teaching 35 hours a week. Of course, that doesn’t include travel, preparation, marking and other unpaid hours. However, the really important point is that I don’t think it would actually be very easy to get those kind of hours, based upon what I’ve been reading and hearing over the past eighteen months. If someone worked three hours every morning for kindy, that would leave them with twenty hours to fill. That would mean they’d need to get four hours every afternoon/evening at buxiban during the week, or a few hours off on one or two days and then Saturday mornings instead. The trouble is that everyone is complaining that jobs out there now have really inconvenient schedules involving two hour blocks at times that preclude a teacher from doing any other gig on that evening.

On the other hand, if one were to work for a major chain such as Hess, it would be possible to get a solid 32.5 hours every week, and the wage cap was (is?) 750NTD/hour. It’s certainly possible to hit 100,000NTD/month like that after a few years, though there are obviously way more hours that are unpaid. Also, are the majority of teachers working for Hess or similar schools that offer such solid, dependable blocks of hours? It’s hard to say, but I would guess that maybe 50% of teachers here (at the most, and probably actually a lot less) are in such a situation.

The other obvious issue is that, yes, someone can teach kindy or substitute, but those are both illegal activities and carry with them great risk, even if it is remote. If a person wants to teach here and do everything completely above board, then there’s no way he’s going to get close to even 60,000NTD, let alone those higher figures.

As HH has mentioned, English teaching carries with it few, if any benefits, especially the bonuses people get here in professional jobs, and there is virtually no job stability. Also, it’s a road to absolutely nowhere in most cases. There is definitely a wage cap here which gets hit very quickly. Some people may be able to get into niche areas, but that’s hardly a proven path for most people. Basically, if someone wants to further his career in EFL, he needs to do two things. Firstly, he needs to get qualifications. Secondly, he needs to leave Taiwan. Even working in a university or the government system isn’t a huge leap forward here. Teaching English is not a profession in this country. It’s in the same league as working on a fast food production line or in a factory. Maybe it pays more, but it’s still essentially monkey work.

I’m only making the point that English teachers regularly make more than these otherwise highly paid professional jobs. I made more than the 85000 dollar engineer on my first month in Taiwan in 1994. I had a full time ELT materials design job (65000 per month) and taught in the evenings at ~700nt/hr. I wasn’t working longer hrs than your average Taiwanese engineer. They were all still there when I walked into their companies at night time.

People have funny ideas. I remember one time I was teaching English at Central News Agency (where Sandman works) and in the break time I’d go out and talk to Wolf or Sandy, but on one occasion there was another of the foreign editors there and he said oh man you are doing that gig. I wouldn’t do it, not for 600nt an hour. They offered it to me and I said no. I was being paid 2200nt/hr.

A lot of the local English teachers doing exam prep and grammar in the big cram schools near Taipei Main Station easily make over $100000. These kind of jobs are not open to foreigners though.

Fox: They don’t regularly make more than those professionals. Some teachers do indeed make serious bank, but they’re very far from the average. Everyone is talking about how hard it is to get 20 hours/week these days, and they certainly aren’t getting anywhere near 700NTD/hour.

Sure, back in the day, you could make a ton of money, but not anymore. A couple of years ago, I was running my own private group class and getting 2,000NTD/hour for it. How many people are getting that though? How many people are making more than 800NTD/hour for privates? You make it out like these gigs are common. They’re not. There’s a massive over-supply of teachers and a massive under-supply of students, meaning hours are hard to get and there’s downward pressure on wages. It’s most definitely a buyer’s market. If people don’t like the English teacher, they know they can have a dozen applicants to replace that teacher by tomorrow, and probably for 600NTD/hour or less.

Recently, there’s been a thread about why it’s so hard to get hours in Gaoxiong. Other posters here have publicly stated that the market in Tainan is difficult also. I’ve heard recently that things are grim in Zhanghua and Taizhong. Hess’ acceptance rate has plummeted over the past four years because of the over-supply of teachers. They’re getting (and turning away) applicants with Master’s degrees. You show me the high-paying gigs that the average teacher here has. You show me what their career prospects will be like here (or abroad) after teaching in Taiwan for ten years.

Ah, thank you for the information. Interesting to see where English teaching fits in.[/quote]
I doubt that. Possibly “few”, but I’ve never heard of an English teacher who makes more than 80-100 000/month (and that’s a stretch, killing yourself with hours IF you can find them), let alone 175 000+… :2cents:

[quote=“Askr”][quote=“pqkdzrwt”]I think I want to be a postman! (:

worldsalaries.org/taiwan.shtml[/quote]

I didn’t see [strike]e[/strike][color=#FF0000]E[/color]nglish teacher on that list.

English teaching [color=#FF0000]is[/color] one of the better jobs you can have it seems. No wonder there [strike]is[/strike][color=#FF0000]are[/color] so many [strike]s[/strike][color=#FF0000]S[/color]outh [strike]a[/strike][color=#FF0000]A[/color]fricans here.[/quote]
:unamused:

And Canadians, Americans etc etc etc…