The Taiwan inch and centimeter..?

Is there a difference between North American measurements ( inches and centimeter’s ) and Taiwan’s ??? Is the a website or chart ??

Yes, CM is more commonly known than centimeter.

Taiwan uses the metric system. Obviously that’s the same anywhere. The Imperial system shows up in a few specific applications–pounds for coffee beans, and ounces for steak, for example. There’s a traditional Chinese system that still gets some usage: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_u … easurement

Ahem, is there still not a nation that clings to the old ways?

You miss my point sir! Obviously yes, but a centimeter is still a centimeter even there, it is.

There are some Taiwanese unit of measurement that’s different else where.

Some of the Taiwanese system is a little different from the traditional Chinese system. Units such as catty is different from Chinese catty. Taiwan’s more similar to the Japanese system. 1斤=600g

There are other unique measurements such as 坪 for area, which is from Japan as well. Another area measurement 甲 is from the Dutch unit Morgen, which is 9699 square meters. The sound 甲 probably came from the word akker.

12AM and 12PM, for example.

Oh, and “Please follow at a safe distance.” Boy is that unit of measurement different here!

Be careful as you can often buy rulers here that appear to have metric measurements along one edge and Imperial measurements along the other. However, what looks like inches is actually (I think they’re called) “metric inches”. Basically, it’s 10 metric inches to the foot.

Here’s a photo of me using one of these rulers for something:

Each “inch” is actually about 3 cm long.

Interesting, and weird. Any idea where this comes from, or what the history is?

I think I’ve seen that and wondered about it, as they’re obviously too big for an inch. Quick search I couldn’t find a reference for “metric inches.” What’s with the almanac type stuff? Do the inches actually represent a calendar?

Edit: I see on my link above a “Chinese inch” or “cun” (Imperial inch is “ying cun”) is 32mm long.

[quote=“Tempo Gain”]I think I’ve seen that and wondered about it, as they’re obviously too big for an inch. Quick search I couldn’t find a reference for “metric inches.” What’s with the almanac type stuff? Do the inches actually represent a calendar?

Edit: I see on my link above a “Chinese inch” or “cun” (Imperial inch is “ying cun”) is 32mm long.[/quote]

it’s mainly for when a superstitious furniture builders and users wants to see what length for a table is good or bad.

[quote=“Tempo Gain”]I think I’ve seen that and wondered about it, as they’re obviously too big for an inch. Quick search I couldn’t find a reference for “metric inches.” What’s with the almanac type stuff? Do the inches actually represent a calendar?

Edit: I see on my link above a “Chinese inch” or “cun” (Imperial inch is “ying cun”) is 32mm long.[/quote]

Yeah, I’m not sure what the official name is (although I seem to remember some reference to a metric inch when I originally looked it up, which would make some sense, since it appears to be ten to each foot [at least they appear to be feet]). Let me see if I get re-find where I got my info from.

Those Chinese inches look about right though.

OK, a quick look at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taiwanese_units_of_measurement has the Taiwanese version of the cùn at closer to 30mm:

They do mention that some of these traditional measurements have ended up being re-standardised to match more closely with metric or Imperial measurements (or in this case a bit of a mix of both).

EDIT: Seems we’ve discussed some of this before: forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopi … 80&t=60169

Interesting, hadn’t noticed the Taiwanese measurements page before. So where do they use these “cun” these days?