What are the rights for expats in Taiwan?

What kind of rights are afforded to Taiwanese expats?

I understand its a “free” country, but I am wondering how that applies to non citizens, could expats for an example, participate in political protests? What about organizing political protests?

Do rights increase the more “permanent” an expat is? Like if you get a PRAC or get married or whatever?

Not that I am planing any such thing, just curious.

EDIT: Fixed the title

[quote=“TheAmericanNomad”]What kind of rights are afforded to Taiwanese expats?

I understand its a “free” country, but I am wondering how that applies to non citizens, could expats for an example, participate in political protests? What about organizing political protests?

Do rights increase the more “permanent” an expat is? Like if you get a PRAC or get married or whatever?

Not that I am planing any such thing, just curious.[/quote]

Do you mean Taiwanese living abroad or westerners living here? If you mean the latter, ‘expat in Taiwan’ is the term. Taiwanese expat is for Taiwanese abroad.

You mean ROC citizens who go and live in Canada or the USA?
I think they have most of the same rights as any citizen, except they can’t vote.
Until they become citizens.

ETA: Dang, toastmaster, beat me by 45 seconds.

No, my mistake, I meant someone working in Taiwan, an expat in Taiwan.

Sorry.

[quote=“TheAmericanNomad”]What kind of rights are afforded to Taiwanese expats?

I understand its a “free” country…[/quote]

What’s the deal on the quotes?
Is that some kind of implication?
Of exactly what?

[quote=“TheAmericanNomad”] I am wondering how that applies to non citizens, could expats for an example, participate in political protests? What about organizing political protests?

Do rights increase the more “permanent” an expat is? Like if you get a PRAC or get married or whatever?

Not that I am planing any such thing, just curious.[/quote]

Since they aren’t allowed to vote, non-citizens are similarly forbidden from participating in any political activities.
I imagine that, if voting rights are afforded to PARC (not PRAC) holders (are they?), then the restriction would be lifted.

Oh, and just to fill you in, the term “expat” isn’t really universally appreciated.

[quote=“the chief”]

Oh, and just to fill you in, the term “expat” isn’t really universally appreciated.[/quote]

Really? Huh, I’ve seen it on here multiple times, plus its the name of a bunch of sites (alloexpat, shanghaiexpat off the top of my head) So, whats the correct term?

Now that is not nice. You know southern Americans (as in People from the south of the United states, not South Americans from South America) would take great offense to being called a Yankee.

Luckily I am not from “the South” and besides, not easily offended.

Oh, and you know, calling me stupid and all, not too nice.

[quote]What’s the deal on the quotes?
Is that some kind of implication?
Of exactly what?[/quote]

Not really anything. I would have put it for any country, because, what is “free” anyway?

[quote=“TheAmericanNomad”][quote=“the chief”]

Really? Huh, I’ve seen it on here multiple times, plus its the name of a bunch of sites (alloexpat, shanghaiexpat off the top of my head) So, whats the correct term?[/quote][/quote]

Well, first of all, those aren’t Taiwan sites.
This is.
Correct term for what?
Oh, you reckon we’re all exactly the same here so there should be some generalised blanket appelation by which you can refer to us.
Try “foreigners”, it’s good enough for our local co-patriates.
FWIW, most of the people who I know reserve the “expat” designation for foreigners working here on a limited contract for a foreign company.
A very small percentage of the posters here fit that profile.
And we never see most of those guys anyway.

[quote=“TheAmericanNomad”][quote]
Stupid fuckin Yanks.
[/quote]

Now that is not nice. You know southern Americans (as in People from the south of the United states, not South Americans from South America) would take great offense to being called a Yankee.

Luckily I am not from “the South” and besides, not easily offended.

Oh, and you know, calling me stupid and all, not too nice.[/quote]

Yeah, I know the difference and I know you ain’t from the South.
You should get used it, though, it’s what a lot of folks out here in the world will use to refer to you.

[quote=“TheAmericanNomad”]

[quote]What’s the deal on the quotes?
Is that some kind of implication?
Of exactly what?[/quote]

Not really anything. I would have put it for any country, because, what is “free” anyway?[/quote]

Well, jeez, if you don’t know, why’d you use it?

Despite your best efforts, I doubt you’ll find much fodder for your lamebrained supposition that non-citizens in the ROC are somehow abused and opressed by the government.
No moreso (and in some cases less so) than citizens themselves are.

Best find another tree.

Wow dude, what is your problem? You still mad that I called your winters mild? Why so hostile? Did an American steal your girlfriend or something? :ponder:

[quote=“the chief”]
Well, first of all, those aren’t Taiwan sites.
This is.
Correct term for what?
Oh, you reckon we’re all exactly the same here so there should be some generalised blanket appelation by which you can refer to us.
Try “foreigners”, it’s good enough for our local co-patriates.
FWIW, most of the people who I know reserve the “expat” designation for foreigners working here on a limited contract for a foreign company.
A very small percentage of the posters here fit that profile.
And we never see most of those guys anyway.[/quote]

Actually, alloexpat does have a Taiwan section, but why would that really even matter? Its general term for people living abroad. According to Merriam-Webster The Intransitive verb for Expatriates, which Expat is short for, is defined as [quote]to leave one’s native country to live elsewhere; also : to renounce allegiance to one’s native country [/quote].

Seems like you would fit into the first part of it there. If it offends anyone I am sorry, but I can’t be blamed for using a word that many on here use, and is defined in the dictionary as what I am trying to say. It specifically says “live elsewhere” which is, what I think most people on this forum do. Foreigners on the other hand can be foreigners while just visiting a country, its a more general term than expat.

And yeah, there should be a word for people who live and work in another country, that is why there is a word for it. Dictionaries are helpful. I was asking about (if you prefer this term) Foreigner’s rights in Taiwan, either way you are generalizing with a blanket application of a word. You know, kind of what words do.

Also Foreigner is (also)a word that can be used with a negative connotation.

[quote=“TheAmericanNomad”]
Yeah, I know the difference and I know you ain’t from the South.
You should get used it, though, it’s what a lot of folks out here in the world will use to refer to you.[/quote]

Actually, right now I live about 45 minutes north of the Southern Capital during the American Civil war, so yeah, no worries, I’m used to it. Are you implying that its better to be from the south?

Also, what do you mean by “here in the world”? Are you saying that America isn’t apart of the world? Are you saying I haven’t traveled abroad before? Or is Taiwan just the center of the world to you?

I have been more places than most. Perhaps not more than many here, but I have traveled to both Asia and Europe, All of North America, Nearly every state in the U.S. including Hawaii, I know what it is like “out there”

[quote]
Well, jeez, if you don’t know, why’d you use it?

Despite your best efforts, I doubt you’ll find much fodder for your lamebrained supposition that non-citizens in the ROC are somehow abused and opressed by the government.
No moreso (and in some cases less so) than citizens themselves are.

Best find another tree.[/quote]

That wasn’t my goal at all, I think you have been spending too much time trolling internet forums, it has made you paranoid. I am actually very active in politics here in the U.S., and, wouldn’t mind going to a protest that I agreed with in Taiwan, wanted to know what my rights with that were.

I’ve fought for immigrants rights here, thought maybe I could in Taiwan as well. No biggie that I can’t, after all its not my place to tell them how to run their country. But I wouldn’t mind being out there and being “counted” for what it is worth.

For what it is worth, “lame brained” is two words, not one.

[quote=“TheAmericanNomad”]Wow dude, what is your problem? You still mad that I called your winters mild? Why so hostile? Did an American steal your girlfriend or something? :ponder:

[quote=“the chief”]
Well, first of all, those aren’t Taiwan sites.
This is.
Correct term for what?
Oh, you reckon we’re all exactly the same here so there should be some generalised blanket appelation by which you can refer to us.
Try “foreigners”, it’s good enough for our local co-patriates.
FWIW, most of the people who I know reserve the “expat” designation for foreigners working here on a limited contract for a foreign company.
A very small percentage of the posters here fit that profile.
And we never see most of those guys anyway.[/quote]

Actually, alloexpat does have a Taiwan section, but why would that really even matter? Its general term for people living abroad. According to Merriam-Webster The Intransitive verb for Expatriates, which Expat is short for, is defined as [quote]to leave one’s native country to live elsewhere; also : to renounce allegiance to one’s native country [/quote].

Seems like you would fit into the first part of it there. If it offends anyone I am sorry, but I can’t be blamed for using a word that many on here use, and is defined in the dictionary as what I am trying to say. It specifically says “live elsewhere” which is, what I think most people on this forum do. Foreigners on the other hand can be foreigners while just visiting a country, its a more general term than expat.

And yeah, there should be a word for people who live and work in another country, that is why there is a word for it. Dictionaries are helpful. I was asking about (if you prefer this term) Foreigner’s rights in Taiwan, either way you are generalizing with a blanket application of a word. You know, kind of what words do.

Also Foreigner is (also)a word that can be used with a negative connotation.

[quote=“TheAmericanNomad”]
Yeah, I know the difference and I know you ain’t from the South.
You should get used it, though, it’s what a lot of folks out here in the world will use to refer to you.[/quote]

Actually, right now I live about 45 minutes north of the Southern Capital during the American Civil war, so yeah, no worries, I’m used to it. Are you implying that its better to be from the south?

Also, what do you mean by “here in the world”? Are you saying that America isn’t apart of the world? Are you saying I haven’t traveled abroad before? Or is Taiwan just the center of the world to you?

I have been more places than most. Perhaps not more than many here, but I have traveled to both Asia and Europe, All of North America, Nearly every state in the U.S. including Hawaii, I know what it is like “out there”

[quote]
Well, jeez, if you don’t know, why’d you use it?

Despite your best efforts, I doubt you’ll find much fodder for your lamebrained supposition that non-citizens in the ROC are somehow abused and opressed by the government.
No moreso (and in some cases less so) than citizens themselves are.

Best find another tree.[/quote]

That wasn’t my goal at all, I think you have been spending too much time trolling internet forums, it has made you paranoid. I am actually very active in politics here in the U.S., and, wouldn’t mind going to a protest that I agreed with in Taiwan, wanted to know what my rights with that were.

I’ve fought for immigrants rights here, thought maybe I could in Taiwan as well. No biggie that I can’t, after all its not my place to tell them how to run their country. But I wouldn’t mind being out there and being “counted” for what it is worth.

For what it is worth, “lame brained” is two words, not one.[/quote]

Oh lordy.
Just when you think there’s no truth in stereotypes… :America:

[quote]
Oh lordy.
Just when you think there’s no truth in stereotypes… :America:[/quote]

Yup, I’ll take that as a win. Now that that is settled, will you tell me if Aliens (is that a better term? :unamused: ) with Permanent Residencies have more rights? (voting, protesting, etc.)

[quote][color=#FF0040]I’ve fought for immigrants rights here[/color], thought maybe I could in Taiwan as well. No biggie that I can’t, after all its not my place to tell them how to run their country. But I wouldn’t mind being out there and being “counted” for what it is worth.

[/quote]

Great I read the rest of the phrase, otherwise, I’d be deaf from the bells ringing in my head.

AN, you have not arrived to The Island, yet you sound as if you were making assumptions and looking for a “cause”… which generates a knee jerk reaction. There are “expats/foreigners/permanent residents” here dedicated to noble causes, and if you use the SEARCH command, you will see that there are important issues that would benefit from enthusistic support. That said, usually those who participate have lived here a long time and understand that in Taiwan, as in any other country, there are rules and regulations and steps to take to promote beneficial changes, i.e. to amend a law/lobby for a cause. They also know there are certain restrictions, which are according to the limits of your visa, regarding political participation, and those laws are not draconian, they usually have such in most democracies regarding foreign intervention in local affairs. meaning no one would object to your waving a flag but one you stand up and make a speech you will be walking a fine line. If caught in a protest, yes, that would be stepping that line, and the authorities here would be in their right to boot you out.

Come, have a look, join a group for starters and see how you can benefit others from your experience. Just do not make it sound too steretypical as in reenacting Superman saving the world, which is the lasting impression.

I’ve heard of rebels without a cause but a protestor looking for sth. to protest??? :doh: Besides who needs an excuse to cause a ruckus???

:roflmao: do protestors get paid?

[quote=“Icon”]They also know there are certain restrictions, which are according to the limits of your visa, regarding political participation, and those laws are not draconian, they usually have such in most democracies regarding foreign intervention in local affairs. meaning no one would object to your waving a flag but one you stand up and make a speech you will be walking a fine line. If caught in a protest, yes, that would be stepping that line, and the authorities here would be in their right to boot you out.
[/quote]
This is exactly what the original post was asking. He was asking the long-time residents what those rules are. Seemed pretty innocuous to me. And apparently a valid question, since it sounds like participating in a political protest can get you in trouble. Then he got jumped all over for using the term expat. :idunno:
When I lived in a European country in 2003, I went to a few protests against the Iraq war. Never occurred to me that a foreigner would not be allowed to do such things. I would have been pretty surprised to get booted out over it.
In the US, someone with a green card can contribute to and volunteer with political campaigns, and foreigners can participate in non election related political activity. So it’s not like the restrictions on such things here should have been obvious to him.

True, but an ARC is not a green card. It seems strange that the OP has already booked a “stand-in” here, but the people he has been in touch with have not told him it is restricted. That I found weird.

Also the tone of the initial inquiry, with th quotation marks, seemed to assume Taiwan was not free, or such was my initial interpretation. His statement came, as one would say, not with the boots on but kicking and screaming.

[quote=“zyzzx”][quote=“Icon”]They also know there are certain restrictions, which are according to the limits of your visa, regarding political participation, and those laws are not draconian, they usually have such in most democracies regarding foreign intervention in local affairs. meaning no one would object to your waving a flag but one you stand up and make a speech you will be walking a fine line. If caught in a protest, yes, that would be stepping that line, and the authorities here would be in their right to boot you out.
[/quote]
This is exactly what the original post was asking. He was asking the long-time residents what those rules are. Seemed pretty innocuous to me. And apparently a valid question, since it sounds like participating in a political protest can get you in trouble. Then he got jumped all over for using the term expat. :idunno:
When I lived in a European country in 2003, I went to a few protests against the Iraq war. Never occurred to me that a foreigner would not be allowed to do such things. I would have been pretty surprised to get booted out over it.
In the US, someone with a green card can contribute to and volunteer with political campaigns, and foreigners can participate in non election related political activity. So it’s not like the restrictions on such things here should have been obvious to him.[/quote]

TAN -
And some of 'em get really pissy if you refer to them as…economic migrant workers:smiley:

I am a proud expat American :America: , married (thus have full working rights) who pays taxes here on the island and fully acknowledge the diversity that is universal in life as we know it!

And also, Taiwan is safely considered a “FREE” country. Some of that “FREEDOM” comes with a steep price tag; but its there for ya if ya want it.

[quote=“Icon”] It seems strange that the OP has already booked a “stand-in” here, but the people he has been in touch with have not told him it is restricted. That I found weird.
[/quote]
Huh? unless that’s in some other thread or he edited something, I did not get that impression at all. He specifically said in the first post

Granted, the quotes in “free” country can come across badly.

There was nothing wrong with his post, just people being dicks on forumosa, as usual. I’d say they should let off some steam at an appropriate target - a delinquent bus driver for example - rather than the innocent OP.

:laughing: :laughing: I am sure you know that delinquent means a young person - a non adult - under 18 years of age, right??? Sure you knew that!! I would love to yell at a 17year old bus driver, until then F.com it is. :stuck_out_tongue:

:laughing: :laughing: I am sure you know that delinquent means a young person - a non adult - under 18 years of age, right??? Sure you knew that!! I would love to yell at a 17year old bus driver, until then F.com it is. :p[/quote]

A juvenile delinquent is under 18 years of age, yes. But is a delinquent account under 18 years of age? Delinquent in the face of duty means being under 18 years old in the face of duty? Whazza waaa?

Saaaaaavvvvvve us Cyber Knight!