Who doesn't like Eric Clapton?

Neither a big fan nor a detractor of Clapton myself.
Enjoy!

Clapton is one overrated windbag

+1 (or given this is anti-Craptone should it be -1 ??)

Rod Stewart rather viciously claimed that song Clapton supposedly wrote after his kid died had been written years earlier when Clapton’s father died.

HG

I’ve seen Clapton twice live. He’s good. I’d pay to see him again…but only if he didn’t play walking blues.

I could never, never understand the appeal of Clapton.

Those graffiti paintings in London? “Clapton is God”?

I was always like wtf? Jimi Hendrix, god. Lots of blues and/or Americana roots guitarists, gods. Jimmy Page, demi-god. As I grew older, I realized that guitarists are way overrated in the scheme of things as I understand them. In fact, comparing guitarists is, imo, silly.

But Clapton? -----, and I’m afraid that’s the best I could say.

Important caveat, and one that may make my opinion less relevant: I do not play guitar, nor am I in any way musically gifted (other than I have exquisite taste in popular music :slight_smile: ).

I think when guitarists like Clapton,Page, Beck, etc. came on the scene in the 60’s, what now sounds like a cliche was actually fresh and innovative guitar playing to listeners of the time, something new and different for them. I grew up in a different decade where there was already Clapton AND the 1000’s of emulations and improvements on the groundbreaking stuff he and his contemporaries came up with. I can see the historical importance of Clapton in terms of the roots of rock and modern guitar, but I’m not blown away. I think he deserves his reputation for his stuff up through the early 70’s, because he was a pioneer of sorts up to that point, but what has he done that’s really noteworthy since Layla?

I expressed the exact same sentiments a few months ago in the greatest guitarist thread after everyone kept naming Clapton. As I said then, I like him, he seems like a nice guy and a very talented musician, he’s had a few really great hits, we all felt terribly when his kid fell out the window, but. . . I didn’t understand why he was so often referred to as one of the world’s greatest guitar players. Sandman enlightened me.

I’m still not sure if I’d put him on a list of the best ever, but as Sandman explained to me, he may be an old has-been now, but he was revolutionary 35 years ago in making blues popular to the masses for his great work on albums such as the Beano album by John Mayall and the Blues Brothers. Check out a few sample tracks below:

amazon.com/gp/product/B00005 … c&v=glance

I was impressed enough with those samples that I went out and bought the album and I’d agree he was a lot greater then. Now it’s smooth polished studio work that’s been played a thousand times by an old expert for an audience of 50 year-olds driving volvos. Back then it was more raw, energetic and fresh.

Btw, I don’t know how old the grafitti is that you refer to, but the phrase “Clapton is God” was apparently popular in the late '60s.

All three of those guitarists were in the Yardbirds. Compare:

  1. Eric in the band - the Yardbirds played boring, generic blues. Zzzzz
  2. Jeff Beck in the band - suddenly they turn into an exciting psychedelic garage band that invents a whole new universe for blues-based rock. Nearly all of their hits come from this era.
  3. Jimmy Page in the band - turn into Led Zeppelin

[quote=“mod lang”]All three of those guitarists were in the Yardbirds. Compare:

  1. Eric in the band - the Yardbirds played boring, generic blues. Zzzzz
  2. Jeff Beck in the band - suddenly they turn into an exciting psychedelic garage band that invents a whole new universe for blues-based rock. Nearly all of their hits come from this era.
  3. Jimmy Page in the band - turn into Led Zeppelin[/quote]

Excellent analysis.

And take it from one who has lived in a “generic blues” wasteland (Kansas, USA), generic blues is a fate far worse than even muzak.

mod lang:
Your analysis is interesting, but I think too subjective:
Clapton-era Yardbirds took a more spirited electric blues direction than later Yardbirds
Beck-era Yardbirds was more experimental in terms of guitar effects and musical textures (exotic scales, modalities, etc.), some would say the best, if not most creative, era of the band
Page-era Yardbirds was short lived and the stuff he recorded with them isn’t really distinguished from other bands of the day, probably as the band broke up soon after he joined. Though as you say, it turned into Led Zeppelin…

Clapton has commented in interviews that he felt constrained by the more straight ahead pop the Yardbirds were pursuing when he was in the band and has cited this as his reason for leaving. I’m not really a Yardbirds fan (of any phase of the band really) but I’d agree with most critics that “Five Yardbirds Live” from Clapton-era Yardbirds is a good live document which shows Clapton and the band stretching out, often inventively, on more blues oriented material, which at the time was groundbreaking and exciting.

[quote=“Red 23”]
Clapton has commented in interviews that he felt constrained by the more straight ahead pop the Yardbirds was pursuing when he was in the band and has cited that as his reason for leaving.[/quote]

:roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao:

As much they might have preferred to stay close to the American blues and R&B that had inspired them (at least at first), the Yardbirds made efforts to crack the pop market from the beginning. A couple of fine studio singles of R&B covers were recorded with Clapton that gave the band’s sound a slight polish without sacrificing its power. The commercial impact was modest in the U.K. and non-existent in the States, however, and the group decided to change direction radically on their third single. Turning away from their blues roots entirely, “For Your Love” was penned by British pop/rock songwriter Graham Gouldman, and introduced many of the traits that would characterize the Yardbirds’ work over the next two years. The melodies were strange (by pop standards) combinations of minor chords; the tempos slowed, speeded up, or ground to a halt unpredictably; the harmonies were droning, almost Gregorian; the arrangements were, by the standards of the time, downright weird, though retaining enough pop appeal to generate chart action. “For Your Love” featured a harpsichord, bongos, and a menacing Keith Relf vocal; it would reach number two in Britain, and number six in the States.

For all its brilliance, “For Your Love” precipitated a major crisis in the band. Eric Clapton wanted to stick close to the blues, and for that matter didn’t like “For Your Love,” barely playing on the record. Shortly afterward, around the beginning of 1965, he left the band, opting to join John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers a bit later in order to keep playing blues guitar. Clapton’s spot was first offered to Jimmy Page, then one of the hottest session players in Britain; Page turned it down, figuring he could make a lot more money by staying where he was. He did, however, recommend another guitarist, Jeff Beck, then playing with an obscure band called the Tridents, as well as having worked a few sessions himself.

Taken from the All Music Guide article at:
http://launch.yahoo.com/ar-269479-bio–The-Yardbirds

why all the bold and underline?

read the thread

uh i have… i am simply asking why do you need to bold and underlin eit… most of us here can get the gist of a few sentences strung together as a paragraph.

using bold and underline on forums is like CAPS - its considered shouting.

no one’s shouting, just pulling out the key points from a long article for those who dont’ want to sift through the whole thing.

[quote=“AWOL”]uh I have… I am simply asking why do you need to bold and underlin eit… most of us here can get the gist of a few sentences strung together as a paragraph.

using bold and underline on forums is like CAPS - its considered shouting.[/quote]

I think OP misunderstood my last as doubting the veracity of the quoted post.
Not at all, that’s old news, everyone knows that.
Rather, I was attempting to indicate the colossal irony of Craptone leaving any outfit on the grounds of it being poppy, considering the decades of mindless derivative pap that he would subsequently inflict upon the public…

couldn’t tell if you were being ironic or if you were taking the piss …anyway, its all in fun

Sorry, I can see how you might.