I've done my research if someone could help me out


#1

About me: ABC guy, Bachelor in BA, 5 years work experience in a wholesale fashion company.

Sent my resume to 15 buxibans so far and no luck. I don’t have any teaching experience.

I know a few non native speakers getting jobs (illegal I think) How did they manage that?

My question is: should I get a TESOL? - Does TESOL need face to face time?

Second question: If someone could introduce a school for me I’d be willing to compensate them with half of my first monthly salary provided its in Taipei city and provide work permit and ARC


#2

:eek:


#3

yyy - why eek. I’m good for it.


#4

If you don’t actually need money, there are other ways to obtain permission to stay/reside in Taiwan, as discussed in a few other threads. You may also be able to find non-teaching work.


#5

Ill look through a few old threads and see YYY. Thanks. If you got any connections at any Bxbans and want to make some extra cash hit me up.


#6

Something seems off about this…all i’m saying


#7

Why do you say that Andrew? Not hearing back is getting me frustrated so I thought I’d try an incentive based introduction.


#8

You are going to give me 50% of what you make every month?


#9

Sorry, just the first month. Should have specified.


#10

I’ve read that people don’t recommend getting TESOL or other certificates, but a lot of the postings require/prefer certificates. Should I get one?


#11

You can get a CELTA in Thailand. That would be a cool pre-Taiwan holiday


#12

Can I ask you a question?

Why do you want to teach? You have no experience. The experience you do have is in fashion, which, actually, might serve you better over here - if you speak Chinese.

I suspect you may simply want to take any job you can get, and since teaching is pretty much come-one-come-all, it sounds like a reasonable way in. Lotsa cats get rolled in that game.

If I were you, I’d start looking around a wide variety of job opportunities found on any number of international job sites.

Additionally, it appears you can write fairly well - a lot better than we’re used to in these parts. Writing and editing gigs pop up. Social media gigs are floating around. Key is your Mandarin, if you got it.

Above all, I’m not discouraging you from coming over here. It’s pretty easy once you get your foot in the door. If I hear of anything, I’ll send it your way, but don’t hold your breath.

Good luck.


#13

That advice right there is easily worth a couple weeks’ worth of Kindy Dollars.


#14

Hi Super_lucky
I speak Fluent Chinese. I want to teach because I feel like i have the right credentials (I am willing to go get certification if that is what it takes; not saying I have the right major and experience) and background. I already live here with my parents. Yea I found two international job sites in English and am applying for those. I really want a work permit and ARC more than anything. As long as the job provides those 2 things (ARC and work permit) I don’t really mind the salary or working hours. I understand the working hours here are long (expected to work overtime for free) and the pay is low. Yea, if you hear of anything let me know. Thanks so much

ABCmanintaiwan


#15

Fair enough. Fluent Mandarin just increased the odds of finding a gig exponentially in your favor.

Why the burning passion for a work permit and ARC? And you’re already here with your parents?

(1) An open work permit is at least five years out of your reach - it’s served with the APRC meal set. The ARC is employer-dependent; you know that, right?
(2) How is it your parents are here doing whatever they’re doing and you’re not already on some kind of ARC?

Sounds like you want to stay in the country and extenuating circumstances may create problems? Generally speaking, when I ask someone why they want to teach, I’m listening for: “I just love teaching and I’m great with kids and I like helping them grasp and digest complicated concepts.” That more or less explains why I’m not a teacher. On the other hand, you definitely have the credentials to teach at a buxiban. And you certainly seem to understand the low-pay/long-hours aspect of the culture.

I think you’ll find something. Keep at it.


#16

ABC dude,
Hit the streets in the area where you want to work.
Just show up at the school, meet the principal and tell them you want to work there!
I have been teaching here for nearly 4 years and it isn’t hard to get a teaching job, but just sending out 5 resumes sounds like a halfhearted attempt to me.
Flash your degree, emphasize your English fluency, and smile.
:slight_smile:


#17

Are your parents Taiwanese? How about an ARC based on JFRV? If there’s a reason for not doing that, then are there other types of work you’d consider? You have a bachelors degree in business administration? Did you focus on any specific part of business administration?


#18

Ho Keoni, my parents are Taiwanese. I am not married so no JFRV (I had to google that). I’d consider any job that would give me a work permit and ARC. My degree states that I have a bachelor of science “business management” I chose management as my area of expertise.


#19

Hi mathpro,

I hit the streets this week and visited 3 schools around me where I wanted to work. I know that might not be enough of “pounding the pavement”.

So far I’ve sent out 25 resumes. I’m really trying my best.


#20

Hi Super_lucky

I already live here with my parents. I REALLY REALLY want a work permit and ARC so that I don’t have to do visa runs and so that I have a job.

  1. Yep, I know that an open work permit is out of my reach.

  2. My parents are taiwanese and they are retired. They have Taiwanese citizenship. (I am over 21 so I cannot get easy citizenship through them)

I want to stay in the country because all my friends and family are here, my 2 grandpas are not in good condition. Yea, I know the answer should be because “I love teaching” but I would say I am very adaptable and I wouldn’t despise/hate the job. Thank you for your help super_lucky.