APRC dependents


#1

Hi guys, I have a question… i currently have an APRC but my wife and son are on ARC as dependents… i understand there was a new law coming that would allow your spouse and son to get APRC based on your APRC… is that already valid? any news on that?


#2

Where did you hear this exactly? There’s no information I can find about it on immigration or other gov’t websites…


#3

AFAIK there is merely a law that will allow you children to stay another two or three years after they reach the age of 20. No work permit included though. Which IMHO is the right thing - otherwise APRC status would be inheritable and thus give people all the benefits of citizenship, i.e. unrestricted residence and working rights without the burden of military service or having to pass a language exam.


#4

A bill has been pending in the Legislative Yuan for some time now.

If memory serves me correctly, it proposes issuing permanent residence immediately to distinguished scholars, business people with large investments etc in Taiwan. Their dependents would also receive permanent residence.

Ordinary permanent residents still cannot sponsor family members for automatic APRCs.

However, if your wife or dependents have lived here for 183 days on your ARC and have NT$5 million in assets, they can get an APRC now.

Your dependent can stay in Taiwan for up to six years after the age of 20 if they grew up in Taiwan. They can’t work though unless they get a work permit by the usual route. The work permit is easier to get for graduates of Taiwanese universities.


#5

AFAIK there is merely a law that will allow you children to stay another two or three years after they reach the age of 20. No work permit included though. Which IMHO is the right thing - otherwise APRC status would be inheritable and thus give people all the benefits of citizenship, i.e. unrestricted residence and working rights without the burden of military service or having to pass a language exam.[/quote]

And in my opinion that is the wrong thing. Residents of most advanced countries can reside and work while paying taxes. Permanent residence is usually inheritable and the right of families to be together is universally recognized. You might have a point about military service except that (a) it has been effectively abolished in Taiwan and (b) there is no reason why permanent residents could not be conscripted.

The difference between residents and citizens is political rights and even that distinction is falling away.


#6

AFAIK there is merely a law that will allow you children to stay another two or three years after they reach the age of 20. No work permit included though. Which IMHO is the right thing - otherwise APRC status would be inheritable and thus give people all the benefits of citizenship, i.e. unrestricted residence and working rights without the burden of military service or having to pass a language exam.[/quote]

And in my opinion that is the wrong thing. Residents of most advanced countries can reside and work while paying taxes. Permanent residence is usually inheritable and the right of families to be together is universally recognized. You might have a point about military service except that (a) it has been effectively abolished in Taiwan and (b) there is no reason why permanent residents could not be conscripted.

The difference between residents and citizens is political rights and even that distinction is falling away.[/quote]

This is a political debate where I respect your opinion just as I hope you respect mine. As for now, for the OP it is what it is…


#7

It is a policy debate, not a political one. In any event, your opinion is useful in that illustrates a certain narrow-minded approach to immigration that is regrettably shared by too many in Taiwan. On the positive side, it is not shared by everyone and as Taiwan population ages and declines, it will be shared by fewer and fewer.

AFAIK there is merely a law that will allow you children to stay another two or three years after they reach the age of 20. No work permit included though. Which IMHO is the right thing - otherwise APRC status would be inheritable and thus give people all the benefits of citizenship, i.e. unrestricted residence and working rights without the burden of military service or having to pass a language exam.[/quote]

And in my opinion that is the wrong thing. Residents of most advanced countries can reside and work while paying taxes. Permanent residence is usually inheritable and the right of families to be together is universally recognized. You might have a point about military service except that (a) it has been effectively abolished in Taiwan and (b) there is no reason why permanent residents could not be conscripted.

The difference between residents and citizens is political rights and even that distinction is falling away.[/quote]

This is a political debate where I respect your opinion just as I hope you respect mine. As for now, for the OP it is what it is…[/quote]


#8

I think rather then a devaluation of citizenship in favour of making rights without responsibility and allegiance (=APRC) inheritable, thus creating a special class of people who can enjoy Taiwan without any burden a citizen may face, the renouncement requirement for naturalisation applicants should be scrapped. That would be laudable and constitute true immigration reform. If then someone is still hindered by his own home country’s renouncement requirement - well too bad. But if people want unrestricted residence and unrestricted work rights and these rights to be inheritable, there is nothing wrong with the state demanding allegiance beyond the ubiquitous “but I feel like I am Taiwanese already, this place is my home!”.


#9

well thx for the feedback… they will stay on ARC and we will see how the law evolves on that matter!!


#10

Hi everyone, I have a question!
I used to hold student ARC and limited hours of working permit while going to university but I got married recently and my wife is an APRC holder. I recently changed my status successful to her APRC as dependent but I would like to know if am eligible to work permit and if YES, what kind of forms do I need and which department should I fill my application?
Any feedback will be great.

Sincerely,
Saikou Ceesay


#11

[quote=“saiks”]Hi everyone, I have a question!
I used to hold student ARC and limited hours of working permit while going to university but I got married recently and my wife is an APRC holder. I recently changed my status successful to her APRC as dependent but I would like to know if am eligible to work permit and if YES, what kind of forms do I need and which department should I fill my application?
Any feedback will be great.

Sincerely,
Saikou Ceesay[/quote]

Hi, how many years were you in Taiwan before you got your APRC? is your wife Taiwanese?
as for the work permit, yes as long as it is an APRC you get to apply for open work permit, there is a section about it here in Forumosa with all the details!.


#12

Eh, he doesn’t have an APRC himself, he is dependent of someone who has one, meaning he has a family visa related ARC. That means he cannot work legally, must get a job that grants him a work permit.

The one that can work anywhere is his wife. APRC rights are not transferable/inheritable. He, as spouse, only has a “common” ARC.


#13

Can a spouse of someone holding an APRC get any type of work? As in, are there any jobs that they are legally allowed to work at? Would it be possible to start a business and employ the spouse at said business?


#14

If they can give that person an ARC, sure. The benefits and rights of APRC are not extendable to next of kin. At best, they allow them to remain in Taiwan with the APRC holder.

The only spouse that has rights to work and such is the spouse of a local ROC citizen.


#15

So according to this, the holder of a dependent ARC sponsored by an APRC holder do not necessarily have to have lived in Taiwan for 5 years (which would be the case if they applied as holder of a work ARC)?

That would be great news for me. Please, this is based on what official information/homepage?


#16

so just want to bump this one up and revisit, see if there have been any changes.

If you have an APRC and are married to a non-ROC citizen, you can sponsor that person for an ARC and they can be with you here legally. But does having an ARC entitle them to any type of work rights? If they wanted to work, would they have to drop the sponsorship from the APRC holder and get it from the employer?

As far as I know, the spouse would not have open work rights like the APRC holder, but if they got a job they were qualified for and were holding an ARC through marriage with an APRC holder, wouldn’t they still only need a work permit and not ARC sponsorship through the employer?

If anyone knows for sure, please post, thanks.


#17

i think you are right. They don’t need to change their marriage based ARC to employment based ARC.

Spouses of Foreign Professionals Taking partly-hours Specialized or Technical Works
https://ezworktaiwan.wda.gov.tw/en/cp.aspx?n=88A58793EA5CB0F6


#18

so they would only be eligible for these types of employment? (legally)


#19

Yes.


#20

what’s the point of such tight restrictions? they don’t want spouses of APRC holders to teach English? Or to marry Southeast Asian women and have them work as domestic helpers or something like that?