Ask urodacus!


#1001

Why do I want the 1000th post?


#1002

[quote=“urodacus”]you?

I have been hella busy with a new job and have been neglecting my duties here. I shall pop back and answer more as soon as i catch breath after Thursday’s deadlines have passed, hopefullly with my not actually dying.[/quote]

What about my Tsunami question? All I got was people telling me I’m crazy. If I’d wanted that opinion I would have listened to those doctors long ago and stayed on my meds… :saywhat: :saywhat:

Pfff–I want my money back.


#1003

you couldn’t surf a tsunami on the open ocean, it’d be too small and too fast to get on.

you probably couldn’t surf one on most places they might land as they just look like a wall of really messy white stuff with no decent shape (from pics and vids I have seen of the recent few), but i guess that there would be some beaches where they would pick up a great shape as they rolled inland. problem then would be knowing when to get off! also, not many waves form above high tide mark at most of the beaches I know, of, so how would you know which beach would have the best break inland?


#1004

Spamming are we? :ohreally:


#1005

Thanks man. That definitely makes sense. As a bit of an aside I was following yet another rancid tributary today, this one coming in from the other side of the river, across from guandu, and found two optimistic things:

  1. In one stretch of the river they actually have front end loaders in scrapping the slime off the bottom. Don’t know what the ultimate intention is there.

  2. In another they have an absoulutely massive project going to clean up the whole thing and turn it into a park.

Check my “a? river” thread after a couple of days if you have the time, I’m going to try to desribe a little better what I saw today. It’s not perfect by a long shot but definitely a BIG step in the right direction.


#1006

What is this gunk…

Is it the algae and bacteria that ferments and forms the festering globules?

That would make a lot of sense because the same places that have the festering globules also have that stuff. There are miles and miles of it coating the bottom of the ditches and creeks that flow into the river.

Also, what does that stuff actually do to the ecology of the river? I imagine it leaches oxygen out but are there other things as well? Algae and bacteria are naturally occuring so…

Oh, what do reckon causes the big fish die offs that you see occassionally?

I don’t mean to be a pest. Off the top of your head is totally OK.

Thanks.


#1007

all the added nutrients in the river (from sewage pollution and farming run-off) cause massive algal blooms that suck up all the oxygen, or pump toxins into the water that then kill the fish. it is not a sign of a river ecosystem in balance.

I can’t see what is in your picture, I guess you might be referring to white bacterial mats…


#1008

Sorry, but that’s actually what it looks like. That bit has about two inches of water on it. It’s just that colour and texture. I bet it is just what you say, a bacterial mat. It looks like a mat. (God it’s fun talking to smart people.)


#1009

I’m not sure if this is the right thread for this or if I should put this in the pet peeves thread, but . . .

Why are almost all peas in Taiwan tasteless?

Can’t they use a different variety or add something to the soil to make it more or less acidic? Can’t they do something?!

A good pea is a great veg. What Taiwan has is an embarrassment.


#1010

[quote=“zender”]I’m not sure if this is the right thread for this or if I should put this in the pet peeves thread, but . . .

Why are almost all peas in Taiwan tasteless?

Can’t they use a different variety or add something to the soil to make it more or less acidic? Can’t they do something?!

A good pea is a great veg. What Taiwan has is an embarrassment.[/quote]
This should be in ‘Pet Peaves’.


#1011

Is xanthium commonly used in modern medicine?? I am across it today for the first time, coz my son who has a cough (that often leads to bronchiolitis) was given that at the Adventist and the dosage is so miniscule, that it made me suspicious and I had to look it up on the net. I see its uses in Chinese medicine but not in modern…is it harmful???


#1012

it is not really harmful unless one eats it in large amounts. it is definitely harmful as a pasture weed to cows and horses who can eat vast quantities of it.

it is unusual to see it in any Western medicine these days, and even hundreds of years ago it was uncommon. In Chinese medicine it is still fairly commonly used in sinus congestion (warm, damp, lung meridian).

Tiny amounts are almost certainly safe, but its probably not effective in that case.


#1013

Thanks, it even sounded deadly (to me) :laughing:


#1014

So, do you think it’s like, gonna all dark n’shit again tonight?


#1015

Yup, it is where I’m driving.

you got weather issues or blackouts?


#1016

Whilst playing rugby a while ago I got elbowed in the 'nads, fortunatelly it was a glancing blow, but I certainly felt sick afterwards , and as we blokes all know a really good shot in the pills will have you vomiting until you dry heave…My question is in 2 parts…
#1. What possible advantage could nature be giving us by making male humans vomit like that :astonished: after a knock to the nuts.
#2. Do animals vomit if they get a good hit, kick or horn to the pills.

one last question why do some animals have their balls on the outside [us, dogs pigs, bulls etc] and some not ?[horses elephants, birds etc] :ponder:


#1017

certainly makes you respect how valuable they are, doesn’t it. I guess that’s the point: you become a lot more protective of them.

Animals that keep them outside use the scrotum muscles to modulate their distance from the body to control how warm the testes are, as in humans, for example, sperm production is best at a slightly lower temperature than the rest of the body’s insides: around 35°.

maybe internal balls are more common in animals that run a lot. I really don’t know…


#1018

[quote=“urodacus”]certainly makes you respect how valuable they are, doesn’t it. I guess that’s the point: you become a lot more protective of them.

Animals that keep them outside use the scrotum muscles to modulate their distance from the body to control how warm the testes are, as in humans, for example, sperm production is best at a slightly lower temperature than the rest of the body’s insides: around 35°.

maybe internal balls are more common in animals that run a lot. I really don’t know…[/quote]

Here’s something most guys don’t know. Ovaries are just as sensitive as “pills.” And sometimes, when a pregnant woman’s expanding uterus happens to squash one, the pain is so severe that the only way to releive it is surgery to free the ovary, which is done even at risk to the baby (as any surgery poses a risk to a baby) because the stress of the horrific pain is also considered unhealthy for the child and mom both.


#1019

I’ve seen on TV how you would go about milking a snake for venom roughly (or so it looks) stab the snake fangs through a membraney piece of paper on a jar, and thus collect the venom.

But, how would you collect venom from other creatures like spiders, scorpions and that?


#1020

[quote=“Funk500”]

But, how would you collect venom from other creatures like spiders, scorpions and that?[/quote]
Chop off the suckers’ head/tail. Suck the shit out with a thin needle/crush it and remove the extraneous. Then sell it as Chinese medicine. Guaranteed to give you a Long Life Hard-On.