Best credit card for rewards?

Yes I know, not another credit card thread! However, this isn’t your typical “how do I get a credit card in Taiwan?” thread.

I am a Taiwanese citizen so getting a credit card isn’t the problem. My question is which bank/card offers the best rewards?

I did a search and couldn’t find very much info. Most of the threads related to airline miles which I have no interest in as I don’t plan on doing a lot of traveling.

I want a card which offers usable perks or rewards. A cash-back card would also be nice.

I saw a pamphlet from Mega bank offering a Visa card. This card lets you buy-one-get-one free when you go to the movies or something like that, can’t remember the specifics. This a useful perk that I’ll be content with. I’m just looking for rewards along these lines, nothing too crazy. I’ll probably go with this card if no one can point to a better deal.

I have two conditions, 1)no annual fee, and 2)no minimum charge amount.

Anyone know of any?

If you’re a Costco member, then their co-branded card through Chinatrust is decent, but not anywhere as good as what I can get back in the US.

E. Sun -Jade Mountain logo card- gives you 1% cash back.

Citi also gives you 40% discount on movie tickets and other stuff -but the interest rate is outrageous -and teh service stinks.

Chinatrust you get a few presents and discounts.

Taipei Bank has buy one get one free for movie tickets, plus a universal miles gatherer card, really convenient but you are not inetrested in that.

Mega has good service, I get prizes from them for using the Pet Lovers’ card. Stuff for my pets, animal videos, etc. :smiley:

How much do you spend on your card each month and do you always pay off the balance in full? Do you make any purchases outside Taiwan (including online)?

Anyone spending at least NT$20,000/mo on their credit card should skip the cashback rewards and go for an airline miles card.

For example if you regularly spend an average of $50,000/mo on the Citibank Eva platinum cobrand card you get one mile for every TW$15 spent. In one year that is 40,000 miles. As an extreme example a business class ticket on Eva costs at least TW$100,000 and you could redeem one of these in around 3 years. The total value of your reward as a percentage of spend is then nearly 5%!

A business class ticket to e.g. Bali on Eva could be earned in just over a year (50,000 miles) and would usually cost over TW$20,000. The reward is then just over 2.5%.

There are also ways to convert airmiles into hotel stays etc. However you use them they are at least 3 times more valuable than 1% - 1.5% cashback rewards.

My current personal favourite airline card is the Amex Cathay Pacific Elite card. The earning rate is not quite as good as the Citibank Eva cobrand but CX is a much better airline, award tickets cost less miles to redeem and Amex customer service is top notch.

I’m not a Costco member, so that’s not gonna work.

[quote=“Icon”]E. Sun -Jade Mountain logo card- gives you 1% cash back.

Citi also gives you 40% discount on movie tickets and other stuff -but the interest rate is outrageous -and teh service stinks.

Chinatrust you get a few presents and discounts.

Taipei Bank has buy one get one free for movie tickets, plus a universal miles gatherer card, really convenient but you are not inetrested in that.

Mega has good service, I get prizes from them for using the Pet Lovers’ card. Stuff for my pets, animal videos, etc. :smiley:[/quote]

I’ve heard enough bad things about Citibank so I’m gonna stay away from them. I always see them hawking their cards by the bottom of the escalators at the Warner movie theater. Their tactics seem very invasive and inappropriate. I see the same thing at in the underground mall at Taipei Main.

Taipei Bank also has the free movie tickets? I’ll definitely have to look into that.

[quote=“llary”]How much do you spend on your card each month and do you always pay off the balance in full? Do you make any purchases outside Taiwan (including online)?

Anyone spending at least NT$20,000/mo on their credit card should skip the cashback rewards and go for an airline miles card.

For example if you regularly spend an average of $50,000/mo on the Citibank Eva platinum cobrand card you get one mile for every TW$15 spent. In one year that is 40,000 miles. As an extreme example a business class ticket on Eva costs at least TW$100,000 and you could redeem one of these in around 3 years. The total value of your reward as a percentage of spend is then nearly 5%!

A business class ticket to e.g. Bali on Eva could be earned in just over a year (50,000 miles) and would usually cost over TW$20,000. The reward is then just over 2.5%.

There are also ways to convert airmiles into hotel stays etc. However you use them they are at least 3 times more valuable than 1% - 1.5% cashback rewards.

My current personal favourite airline card is the Amex Cathay Pacific Elite card. The earning rate is not quite as good as the Citibank Eva cobrand but CX is a much better airline, award tickets cost less miles to redeem and Amex customer service is top notch.[/quote]

I plan on using it for everyday small purchases like food, gas, groceries, convenience items, household items, etc, anywhere that will let me pay with a credit card. The occasion semi-big ticket item and occasional out-of-Taiwan online purchase. Don’t think I’ll be spending 20K a month though. And I plan on completely paying off the balance every month. So interest rate doesn’t matter.

Like I said, I really don’t need an airline card. Don’t plan on doing a lot of flying and if/when I do need air tickets, I’ve got that covered through other means.

I’m more interested in tangible, usable perks that can be consumed in the immediate future. Store discounts, food, movie tickets, anything like that.

There should be a lot of sites in Chinese with more complete details on Taiwanese credit cards than a site for foreigners who have a hell of a time even getting a card. If I were a local, I’d be browsing bank sites. Unfortunately, my Chinese sucks.

I wish I could shop cards for benefits. It took me 3 years and 3 rejections to finally get my first card, and that was only because the bank branch manager wanted to practice English and maybe show his pull. Then it took another 2 years before I got another card, which took a local guarantor and a friend who used to work for that bank’s credit card department to make 2 calls to the manager to pull strings. The second call was after they rejected my application with no reason given, despite 5 years stable income in Taiwan, a bank account in their bank for 5 years with no problems, 2 years of perfect local credit history and a financially secure local guarantor. Benefits are nice, but I’m just happy to get a card.

So I can’t speak to the benefits of many cards, but I can share about the two I managed to get.

The card I just got was Taipei Fubon’s aPower card. I drive a gas guzzling tank and with the aPower card I can get a 2-2.5NT/liter discount on gas at NPC. That translates to about an 8% discount. Since I drive a lot for work, that’s a big benefit for me. Not sure what other benefits it might have because I just got it and haven’t really looked into it.

The First Bank card gets me an hour of free parking at some spots around Taipei and points for junk out of a catalog. Again, there might be other benefits but I’ve not spoken to anyone about it and I can’t read Chinese to browse their site.

Well, for example, a couple of days ago we went to a famous Pekin duck restaurant. Using the Citi card we got two dishes for free -they were good, a cabbage vinagrette and some liang mien- while Chinatrust use would give us only one. :smiley:

Taishin gives you a lot of perks -discounts, gifts- and since OP is not furriner, no problem. They really do not like us furriner, even spendrifts as meself. Plus it’s got most tie-ins with major department stores/restaurants, etc. My friends and oworkers use them the most, so I guess it’s good.

[quote=“CraigTPE”]There should be a lot of sites in Chinese with more complete details on Taiwanese credit cards than a site for foreigners who have a hell of a time even getting a card. If I were a local, I’d be browsing bank sites. Unfortunately, my Chinese sucks.

[/quote]

Correct. Such sites do exist. My wife got a card recently and I remember a particular site that lists virtually all major bank cards, their rates and benefits.