Bringing a Mainland Chinese Wife to Taiwan

For those of you interested, I emailed the Taiwanese “consulate” in Los Angeles about bringing my Mainland Chinese wife to Taiwan. I’m a student, studying Chinese language, and asked if it would be possible to bring her with me were I to relocate to Taiwan and finish my studies. Here’s the reply:

As a foreign student, your Mainland Chinese wife can not accompany you to stay in Taiwan. But Mainland Chinese living out of Mainland China and holding permanent resident certificate abroad (such as U.S. green card etc.) may apply for travel permit to Taiwan. The maximum of each stay is 10 days. No extension will be granted.

When applying for travel permit, Mainland Chinese mentioned above must submit the following documents with one current, full face photograph of themselves to the authority,

  1. Application form for travel permit(It is available in TECO or can be download at the web site:// www.immigration.gov.tw).

  2. Mainland Chinese passport. The remaining validity of passport shall be
    no less than six months.

  3. Permanent Resident Certificate.

  4. Processing of application takes half of a business day in TECO; 4 days in Taiwan.(The travel permit will be approved and issued by the Bureau of immigration in Taiwan)

  5. Visa fee is free of charge in TECO; $400 NT dollars charged by the Bureau of immigration in Taiwan.

Oh dear.

There are other threads about this somewhere. Hopefully Lord Lucan can drop some of his experience here, although he;s been a tad erratic of late.

HG

[quote=“Huang Guang Chen”]Oh dear.

There are other threads about this somewhere. Hopefully Lord Lucan can drop some of his experience here, although he;s been a tad erratic of late.

HG[/quote]

Erratic?

Letting her come in at all is a big improvement on my situation a few years ago.

Lots posted on the forum about this. No need to repeat it here, really.

Erratic?[/quote]It’s a nice way of saying ‘continuously shitfaced’. :wink: I wish people were that subtle when describing my, er, colorful character…

[quote=“lilongyue”]For those of you interested, I emailed the Taiwanese “consulate” in Los Angeles about bringing my Mainland Chinese wife to Taiwan. I’m a student, studying Chinese language, and asked if it would be possible to bring her with me were I to relocate to Taiwan and finish my studies. Here’s the reply:

As a foreign student, your Mainland Chinese wife can not accompany you to stay in Taiwan. But Mainland Chinese living out of Mainland China and holding permanent resident certificate abroad (such as U.S. green card etc.) may apply for travel permit to Taiwan. The maximum of each stay is 10 days. No extension will be granted.
[/quote]

If it were me, I’d send a letter to the Taiwan Rep Office in Los Angeles and thank them for their reply, and then inform them that due to Taiwan’s ridiculously restrictive policy, you will instead be studying in Mainland China and spending all of your cash there rather than in Taiwan. Thanks, but no thanks.

:s

They will only let her in if you spend three years fighting them. Then, just when you’ve irrevocably finalised your plans to leave they will let her in.

[quote=“lilongyue”]For those of you interested, I emailed the Taiwanese “consulate” in Los Angeles about bringing my Mainland Chinese wife to Taiwan. I’m a student, studying Chinese language, and asked if it would be possible to bring her with me were I to relocate to Taiwan and finish my studies. Here’s the reply:

As a foreign student, your Mainland Chinese wife can not accompany you to stay in Taiwan. But Mainland Chinese living out of Mainland China and holding permanent resident certificate abroad (such as U.S. green card etc.) may apply for travel permit to Taiwan. The maximum of each stay is 10 days. No extension will be granted.

When applying for travel permit, Mainland Chinese mentioned above must submit the following documents with one current, full face photograph of themselves to the authority,

  1. Application form for travel permit(It is available in TECO or can be download at the web site:// www.immigration.gov.tw).

  2. Mainland Chinese passport. The remaining validity of passport shall be
    no less than six months.

  3. Permanent Resident Certificate.

  4. Processing of application takes half of a business day in TECO; 4 days in Taiwan.(The travel permit will be approved and issued by the Bureau of immigration in Taiwan)

  5. Visa fee is free of charge in TECO; $400 NT dollars charged by the Bureau of immigration in Taiwan.[/quote]

If she has an American passport or a passport from a Western European country she can be treated as any other citizen of those countries and same rights apply. In other words, dont use her mainland passport to enter Taiwan.

Since students are rarely allowed to work freely (there are restrictions I believe) she may be subject to whatever regulations pertain to being a spouse of a student.

The point is make sure she gets a different passport then one from China and then she is subject to be treated as any other citizen of that nation.

[quote=“tommy525”][quote=“lilongyue”]For those of you interested, I emailed the Taiwanese “consulate” in Los Angeles about bringing my Mainland Chinese wife to Taiwan. I’m a student, studying Chinese language, and asked if it would be possible to bring her with me were I to relocate to Taiwan and finish my studies. Here’s the reply:

As a foreign student, your Mainland Chinese wife can not accompany you to stay in Taiwan. But Mainland Chinese living out of Mainland China and holding permanent resident certificate abroad (such as U.S. green card etc.) may apply for travel permit to Taiwan. The maximum of each stay is 10 days. No extension will be granted.

When applying for travel permit, Mainland Chinese mentioned above must submit the following documents with one current, full face photograph of themselves to the authority,

  1. Application form for travel permit(It is available in TECO or can be download at the web site:// www.immigration.gov.tw).

  2. Mainland Chinese passport. The remaining validity of passport shall be
    no less than six months.

  3. Permanent Resident Certificate.

  4. Processing of application takes half of a business day in TECO; 4 days in Taiwan.(The travel permit will be approved and issued by the Bureau of immigration in Taiwan)

  5. Visa fee is free of charge in TECO; $400 NT dollars charged by the Bureau of immigration in Taiwan.[/quote]

If she has an American passport or a passport from a Western European country she can be treated as any other citizen of those countries and same rights apply. In other words, dont use her mainland passport to enter Taiwan.

Since students are rarely allowed to work freely (there are restrictions I believe) she may be subject to whatever regulations pertain to being a spouse of a student.

The point is make sure she gets a different passport then one from China and then she is subject to be treated as any other citizen of that nation.[/quote]

HAHAHAHAHA!!!

Ever actually tried it?

REally? is it an issue if a person from China uses his/her US passport that they will be treated differently? Why? Possible spy?

The rules for Mainland Chinese citizens is different for other foreigners. Many men here have PRC brides that cannot get visa’s to come to Taiwan as there is an anuual limit.

Spying has nothing to do with it.

The rules for Mainland Chinese citizens is different for other foreigners. Many men here have PRC brides that cannot get visa’s to come to Taiwan as there is an anuual limit.

Spying has nothing to do with it.[/quote]

Of course you mean mainland wives who have only PRC passports.

I was referring to people originally from the mainland who now hold US and European passports. They can come to taiwan without prejudice using their US or Euro passports far as I understand

The rules for Mainland Chinese citizens is different for other foreigners. Many men here have PRC brides that cannot get visa’s to come to Taiwan as there is an anuual limit.

Spying has nothing to do with it.[/quote]

Of course you mean mainland wives who have only PRC passports.

I was referring to people originally from the mainland who now hold US and European passports. They can come to Taiwan without prejudice using their US or Euro passports far as I understand[/quote]

You understand wrong. Or your personal experience is diametrically opposed to mine. Are you going to post your personal experience in this matter? It would be illuminating.

You understand wrong. Or your personal experience is diametrically opposed to mine. Are you going to post your personal experience in this matter? It would be illuminating.[/quote]

LL, are you sure about that, as that was my understanding as well, and i do know one guy who got his wife in as her application was done through her foreign passport and not her Mainland Chinese one.

How would the Taiwanese authorities even know if the person applying on say a US or UK passport was from mainland China, unless said applicant made the mistake of saying so.

I think legally they cannot discriminate against her if she was carrying a US passport. The US govt would be in an uproar. And so would the major euro countries with whom Taiwan cares about its ties. Australia and New Zealand too. Or Japan.

Taiwan only dares to bully some southeast asian and maybe some african nationals other then PRC passport holders of course (who get "special " treatment)

NO mainland wife personally so I am afraid I cannot vouch on a personal basis. If you tried to get your wife in on her US/OZ/EURO passport and were discriminated against. I am sorry to hear that and I feel that is VERY wrong. And I would protest at the relevant foreign ministry.

You understand wrong. Or your personal experience is diametrically opposed to mine. Are you going to post your personal experience in this matter? It would be illuminating.[/quote]

LL, are you sure about that, as that was my understanding as well, and I do know one guy who got his wife in as her application was done through her foreign passport and not her Mainland Chinese one.

How would the Taiwanese authorities even know if the person applying on say a US or UK passport was from mainland China, unless said applicant made the mistake of saying so.[/quote]

Well even passports show a place of birth. But thats not the issue. The issue is what nationality the person enters Taiwan on, I believe.

But Lord Lucan who partner is a Mainland Chinese who now lives in CHina on her UK passport and has lived in Taiwan before might very well know better than all of us.

It doesn’t matter what passport wife has. If it says Mainland China background, she’s automatically in the “special” process. Going to be really tough.

The successful cases that I know of were through government intervention on behalf of the applicant husband. Husband’s government representative needs to be engaged in the visa process.

I wouldn’t guarantee it though.

You understand wrong. Or your personal experience is diametrically opposed to mine. Are you going to post your personal experience in this matter? It would be illuminating.[/quote]

LL, are you sure about that, as that was my understanding as well, and I do know one guy who got his wife in as her application was done through her foreign passport and not her Mainland Chinese one.

How would the Taiwanese authorities even know if the person applying on say a US or UK passport was from mainland China, unless said applicant made the mistake of saying so.[/quote]

Well even passports show a place of birth. But thats not the issue. The issue is what nationality the person enters Taiwan on, I believe.

But Lord Lucan who partner is a Mainland Chinese who now lives in China on her UK passport and has lived in Taiwan before might very well know better than all of us.[/quote]

So the passport shows the place of birth, so what. So on that basis, any foreign couple happening to have a child whilst posted in China would never be able to bring that child to Taiwan just because it was born in China, absolute twaddle. What does place of birth have to do with nationality ? Being born in a lot of countries does not automatically make you a national of said country.

If reality is that just being born in China regardless of nationality when trying to enter Taiwan is grounds for special treatment, then this country is even more f**ked up then i had given it credit for, and i already give it quite a bit of credit. :slight_smile:

Prepare yourself for the further let down.

HG

You understand wrong. Or your personal experience is diametrically opposed to mine. Are you going to post your personal experience in this matter? It would be illuminating.[/quote]

LL, are you sure about that, as that was my understanding as well, and I do know one guy who got his wife in as her application was done through her foreign passport and not her Mainland Chinese one.

How would the Taiwanese authorities even know if the person applying on say a US or UK passport was from mainland China, unless said applicant made the mistake of saying so.[/quote]

Well even passports show a place of birth. But thats not the issue. The issue is what nationality the person enters Taiwan on, I believe.

But Lord Lucan who partner is a Mainland Chinese who now lives in China on her UK passport and has lived in Taiwan before might very well know better than all of us.[/quote]

So the passport shows the place of birth, so what. So on that basis, any foreign couple happening to have a child whilst posted in China would never be able to bring that child to Taiwan just because it was born in China, absolute twaddle. What does place of birth have to do with nationality ? Being born in a lot of countries does not automatically make you a national of said country.

If reality is that just being born in China regardless of nationality when trying to enter Taiwan is grounds for special treatment, then this country is even more f**ked up then I had given it credit for, and i already give it quite a bit of credit. :slight_smile:[/quote]

Please read the post again. It’s about bring a PRC national as a spouse into Taiwan. Not about expats kids who are not PRC nationals but are born in China.

[quote=“Yellow Cartman”]It doesn’t matter what passport wife has. If it says Mainland China background, she’s automatically in the “special” process. Going to be really tough.

The successful cases that I know of were through government intervention on behalf of the applicant husband. Husband’s government representative needs to be engaged in the visa process.

I wouldn’t guarantee it though.[/quote]

Yes, as you may remember, in my case it was a combination of guanxi in Taiwan and full involvement of the British government reps in Taiwan, who to their credit took the thing rather more seriously than I would have expected. it took two years for the resident permit - a visitor visa is easy.

It’s a long and complicated process and legal advice is necessary.