Do you have an "official" Chinese name? [poll and discussion]

  • Yes, by choice.
  • Yes, required.
  • No, I don’t have use for one.
  • No, why are you asking?

0 voters

This issue arises from another thread. I have a Chinese name on my ARC, which facilitates document/identity verification. I was required to have one to open a bank account, so my first boss just gave me the name. It is “supposedly” a lucky name, but is obviously a foreigner’s name. Other posters report not needing a Chinese name and not having one on their ARC. I use my Chinese name and signature for practically every official purpose. Curious about others’ use (or not) of a Chinese name.

I chose mine myself and use it now for anything official too.

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Nice. Part of me wishes I could have thoughtfully determined my own Chinese name. On the other hand, I wouldn’t change it now, even if I could. It’s a perfect fit. Plus, the surname is obscure and one of those tricky characters that changes sound when it’s used as a name (resulting in teachable moments aplenty).

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My Chinese name was chosen for me by a classical Chinese nerd professor I had in college, and it’s obscure to the point that most people in Taiwan don’t know how to pronounce it, much less write it. This always involves a protracted discussion, so I guess it’s a conversation starter. But even after I carefully explain how to write it, the other person always ends up writing it wrong. Sometimes I think that professor of mine was playing a very extended practical joke on me.

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Let’s just call you Nai Nai or Nei Nei (奶奶):baby_bottle:

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I ain’t nobody’s granny. :face_with_raised_eyebrow:

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I have cram school teaching experience and wonder if some similarly minded teachers thought up names like Apple, Lion, etc. Then again, when students name themselves, results can be quite entertaining.

I like the obscure names, as you mentioned, at least for conversation starters. Heck, my English surname is relatively uncommon, and people 90% of the time misspell my given name.

Same with my surname, so maybe my professor was just trying to stay true to my real name. :thinking:

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Reminds me of a uni student with the name 乃 who chose the English name “Nipple.”

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Chosen by my wife to make it sound like my last name

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I hate to be the one to tell you this, but “AhDohGah” isn’t what I would call lucky.

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Mine sounds like my first name and has my wife’s family name. It seemed convenient. I needed it for my marriage licence. It irritates me a little, but at least it’s easy to write. I’ve never had the need to use it.

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I was told it was a term of endearment, particularly when prefaced by “Shee” (which must mean something similar to “sir.”) :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes:

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No need for a chop at all? Just use a thumbprint?

Where is “Yes, it was bestowed upon me”? It seems like a lot of posters were named by others and not necessarily but choice.

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Good point! I tried to edit the poll, but too late.

I don’t have a credit card. Any shit I do at the bank or the government is with my laowai signature.

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Useful information. Thanks. So, I assume it’s nowhere on your ARC then?

It is on my APRC. I have no idea what purpose it serves, though.

Probably just related to my marriage licence.

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My Chinese name is based on my nickname, which my dad came up with when I was very little. It sounds nothing like my English name.

Sometimes when people only see my Chinese name and no other information about me alongside it, they assume I’m male. It’s a bit of an unusual character selection for a gal. Without giving too much away, my mom just wanted to make my name easier for me to write.

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