From Taiwan - Netflix Is Making It Harder to Be a Missionary

Good read for anyone experiencing/experienced with culture shock, or interested in ministry.

Rachel Kleppen lives in Taipei, Taiwan, with her husband, Travis, and son, Benaiah, where they work with the local Youth With A Mission base. She has a BA in youth ministry and biblical studies from Bethel University in St. Paul, Minnesota.

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Interesting point of view.

Not to mention the futility of trying to spread the Word in Taiwan, a country that, after after 74 years of openness to missionaries, has a Christian population of about 3%.

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Christianity has only taken off in two Asian countries; the Philippines and South Korea.

I for one am glad that traditional Taoist and Buddhist beliefs thrive here. Evangelical Christians do prayer sit-ins at Buddhist temples in South Korea, disrespecting their religion at best, and actively persecuting them for their beliefs at worst.

That said, I’m never rude towards missionaries when they approach me on the street. I just politely nod, smile and then look for an appropriate exit.

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I was just amazed you can get a BA in 'youth ministry and Bible studies '. :sunglasses:

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YWAM has their own university called “university of the nations”.

I do not even know what it takes to be a YWAM staff, like how do they get people to give into their ministries, and what do they do apart from the various stuff YWAM organizes?

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The other thing is, they’re thinking too simplistic.

I mean, you can say “well I blame netflix as to why people won’t come to Christ” and all that but I think it’s naive to think one software platform is responsible, or even one technology.

Too many YWAM member I spoke to have such simplistic views about people, and when talking to them I get the sense of “I am above your problem” or “your problem doesn’t matter”, well it’s kinda hard to win hearts and minds this way. I mean why take some missionary seriously when they seem to have really comfortable lives compared to me? Who are they to tell me what my priorities should be?

Or maybe Taiwan needs to start persecuting Christians to get them to take things more seriously? Because in China Christians are persecuted, and they are doing better.

I finally found something more worthless than my English Lit degree. :smirk:

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The article wasn’t really a complaint about how x or y is necessarily preventing people from converting. From what I gathered it’s a commentary about how they found themselves not integrating properly with the culture because of modern distractions and how if your heart and mind are “at home” via facebook and netflix and the like then you can’t be present enough IRL to do good missionary work.

But anyway, I don’t care. Honestly, the worst part about Christianity IMO is the whole scriptural obligation to bring salvation to all the world’s heathens and savages. So annoying. Just leave people alone.

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It can be annoying at times, but there’s a certain logic to it. The idea is you’re actually saving the people. If someone’s sincere, and will take no for an answer and move on, it’s hard to blame them.

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I mean, I get it, but no matter how pure their intention it still rubs me the wrong way.

What can I say? I’m surly and disagreeable. That’s the way “God” made me. And also the raccoon guy.

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I’m Christian and don’t even mention it in real life unless asked. If they ask more questions I tell them or I might mention I can’t join in.a particular activity because of my religion, but not my business to judge them for it. I’m obviously active in the religious forum here but that’s what it is for and I’m mainly defending Christianity not trying to convert, everything has it’s time. I’m also glad they have kept much of their traditional cultures alive most Christians are not responsible for such acts as blowing up Buddist statues etc. Not now anyway. Below screen shot from Wiki

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Wrong.

You got a lot of countries in Asia where Christianity has taken off, from Georgia to East Timor

If we can leave out culturally European parts of West Asia, anywhere else besides East Timor? Seems more right than “Wrong.”

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What are they saying about Ma and folk religion?

He was criticized by some Christian’s I think from those in the DPPs christian faction for bowing at temples. He said he was just bowing out of respect (which I do too just like I remove my shoes in people’s houses if it is their custom) , but some refused to.accept this and claimed it was idol worship.

Oh gee, so sorry for forgetting East Timor. Can you ever forgive me? :roll_eyes: As for the others, I’m obviously talking about East Asia and SE Asia where missionaries tried spreading “the word” in the 19th and early 20th century. As @tempogain said, those other countries are culturally Western and you can say they’re in Eastern Europe as much as you can argue they’re in Western Asia.

I’m a actually doubtful that Taiwan is only 2 to 5% Christian. I wonder where the stats are coming from, how they are collected and what do they consider constituting as Christian. Obviously most of the indigenous tribes are Christian and then there would be a fairly large number in Taipei and along the north coast. I doubt they included mormon in the figures. I doubt more than 20% but 2 to 5% seems to be on the low side unless they included atheists. Is this Christian’s registered at a church or just a telephone poll? Anyone know?

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Also there’s a large number of Taiwanese who are secretly Christian because their family would disown them for abandoning their ancestry. So they probably wouldn’t tell anyone else that they are Christian. Taiwanese are very much “live and let live” except when it comes to their own family.

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I also find this percentage a bit low. From what I can see in the north, there’s quite a lot of Taiwanese Christians. But it may also be that the majority of them just happen to be living up north.

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