Magic mushrooms growing in YMS

taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/ … 2003590407

Oh boy, guess people are not just going to go to YMS to see the flowers now.

Which idiot would pick mushrooms growing on top of cowdung and take them home and make a stir fry ??

[quote=“tommy525”]http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2014/05/15/2003590407

Oh boy, guess people are not just going to go to YMS to see the flowers now.

Which idiot would pick mushrooms growing on top of cowdung and take them home and make a stir fry ??[/quote]

According to the report, the mushrooms are illegal in Taiwan, despite the fact they grow naturally.

It’s kind of like banning grass and trees and such.

Ban the cows and concrete the mountains would fix this problem.

1 Like

I also had this uncontrollable drooling

I saw that report and sure enough they were growing in the cow shit as per usual :slight_smile:.

1 Like

Are there some super-tasty unmagical mushrooms that usually grow in cowshit on YMS?

Don’t they need to be boiled up for quite some time to get the full effect?

This is why I question Taiwanese education. They have this horrible projects at school, where they collect hundreds of leaves and plants and label them in Latin and memorize hundreds of pages of biology and botanic descriptions and stuff… and they never learn/mention which mushrooms are poisonous and which are not? Pleezeee…

Back in the ol country, maybe it is because people do use mushrooms for recreational rather than culinary purposes, mushroom lore is more common. More importantly, knowing the difference between kinds of mushrooms is a matter of life and death. One bad trip is better than Hello Saint Peter!

But here, rather than teaching, they ban. I bet your average student does not know that mushrooms can be used for their narcoleptic properties. That is why they are banned. Better ban than trust people to understand.

Wonder how they will ban mushrooms from growing wild?

A 24 year old should know better. I mean, that is a college graduate. But then college graduates do not know that tying up a limb cuts circulation, or other tidbits I rather not…

Psylocibes cubensis :slight_smile:

The article is funny. I mean, somebody picking up random mushrooms (that can take you to the grave), the police taking the mushrooms to the lab (what for?), a guy warning that they can be found not only in YMS :smiley:

It also says that this mushroom can kill you (I really doubt it)…

I tried them once. I had to use some complementary something for enhancing the effects… and well, that was interesting. A not necessary yet interesting experience.

Yeah magic mushrooms can be pretty awesome, you’d have to eat a lot to kill yourself.
Surprised they grow here,
Taiwan has some other interesting trippy plants, one at least grows pretty much everywhere and contains one of the potent hallucinogens known to man.
And no I am not going to tell you what is is :slight_smile:.

Wormwood?

Mushrooms have to be boiled up and concentrated to have a really good weeknd. Someone told me.

Uh, morning glory?

Lysergic acid amide is not one of the most potent hallucinogens. nothing like LSD.

but perhaps you mean something else.

maybe even this.

Datura

http://case.ntu.edu.tw/blog/?p=6170

.

See cows, expect mushrooms.

They are everywhere in Taiwan, especially on the east. I can’t believe that they have only just realized that mushrooms grow on Yamingshan. You see them all the time when hiking. And how about all those trippy toads you can lick?

The thing grows everywhere around Central and Southern Taiwan, possibly the North too :slight_smile:. This stuff is the pinnacle of hallucinogenics, who would have known.
But there are quite a few poisonous/herbal/trippy plants out there.
But even if you identify the one I’m talking about, I’m not going to confirm it. :whistle: Do your homework. :popcorn:

[quote=“Ermintrude”]Wormwood?

Mushrooms have to be boiled up and concentrated to have a really good weekend. Someone told me.[/quote]

Not really necessary. Eating four or five of them, straight up, is a reasonable starter dose (but depends on the content of psilocybin. Some are stronger than others, same as some strawberries are sweeter than others).

Nobody told me, I know from experience.

No need to extract the psilocybin at all. Or one can cook them into an omelette, or even a stir fry as this joker did. But seriously, unless you really know what you’re looking at, picking wild mushrooms is asking for trouble as many many mushrooms are horribly toxic. One identifying feature of psilocybin-containing mushrooms is that the psilocybin, once exposed to oxygen, oxidises to become dark blue. Bruise the stems by squeezing them and they should turn dark blue in a few minutes. Another feature for identifying mushrooms of the Psilocybe genus is the spore print is very dark violet to black (leave the head of the mush=room right side p on a piece of white paper so that the spores fall from the gills onto the page. tap or stress the cap to release spores, or just leave it for a few hours). Other genera have different color spore color, eg Panaeolus, though they can look similar to Psilocybe (but grow in the grass rather than in dung). The Psilocybe in Taiwan YMS is most likely to be P. subcaerulipes, which is also know as P. taiwanensis

(Int J Med Mushrooms. 2013;15(6):607-15.
The Japanese hallucinogenic mushrooms Psilocybe and a new synonym of P. subcaerulipes with three asiatic species belong to section Zapotecorum (Higher Basidiomycetes).
Guzman G, Cortes-Perez A, Ramirez-Guillen F.)

PS: Don’t lick toads, they contain more heart toxin than hallucinogen. Seriously bad for you.

1 Like

Datura extramonium? Belladona?

Acacia…everywhere in Taiwan, if you know how to prepare it it’ll produce DMT. And DMT is a mutha-f*cka of a drug. Don’t ask me how I know. :cactus: :cactus: :cactus:

1 Like

[quote=“urodacus”][quote=“Ermintrude”]Wormwood?

Mushrooms have to be boiled up and concentrated to have a really good weekend. Someone told me.[/quote]

Not really necessary. Eating four or five of them, straight up, is a reasonable starter dose (but depends on the content of psilocybin. Some are stronger than others, same as some strawberries are sweeter than others).

Nobody told me, I know from experience.

No need to extract the psilocybin at all. Or one can cook them into an omelette, or even a stir fry as this joker did. But seriously, unless you really know what you’re looking at, picking wild mushrooms is asking for trouble as many many mushrooms are horribly toxic. One identifying feature of psilocybin-containing mushrooms is that the psilocybin, once exposed to oxygen, oxidises to become dark blue. Bruise the stems by squeezing them and they should turn dark blue in a few minutes. Another feature for identifying mushrooms of the Psilocybe genus is the spore print is very dark violet to black (leave the head of the mush=room right side p on a piece of white paper so that the spores fall from the gills onto the page. tap or stress the cap to release spores, or just leave it for a few hours). Other genera have different color spore color, eg Panaeolus, though they can look similar to Psilocybe (but grow in the grass rather than in dung). The Psilocybe in Taiwan YMS is most likely to be P. subcaerulipes, which is also know as P. taiwanensis

(Int J Med Mushrooms. 2013;15(6):607-15.
The Japanese hallucinogenic mushrooms Psilocybe and a new synonym of P. subcaerulipes with three asiatic species belong to section Zapotecorum (Higher Basidiomycetes).
Guzman G, Cortes-Perez A, Ramirez-Guillen F.)

PS: Don’t lick toads, they contain more heart toxin than hallucinogen. Seriously bad for you.[/quote]

I believe you. But we used to boil them. Integral, according to the ancients of Mumu/party people, not that I did much research, nor gave a shit. For best results, mix them with half a dozen Es, half a gram of cheap amphetamine, home made cider, a bit of weed and whatever else was going around. It was the 90s. Britain is different now.

Sounds like a party!

I could go into the details of an acid-base extraction series for Acacia bark but I won’t. Suffice to say that a kilo of bark gives about several doses of DMT with ~50% efficient extraction, starting with a methanol extraction. And not all species of Acacia work for this. Acacia confusa is one that is common in Taiwan. its local name is 相思樹 (which amusingly translates as “thinking-of-each-other tree”).

The root (相思樹根) has some limited use in traditional medicine for liver disease. It is carried by “herbal medicine stores” (草藥店 or 青草店), though not every store would have it, since the demand is low. There is a huge conglomeration of these herbal shops next to Longshan temple (龍山寺) in Taipei, where fresh root can be purchased (as of April 2010, 150 Taiwan dollars, roughly $5, for 600g, with 1 day pre-order needed). The bark can be easily separated from the fresh root.

Buying and taking Chinese medicine is not illegal, neh?

1 Like