Taiwan needs Immigration Reform -- DUH

taipeitimes.com/News/feat/ar … 2003575628

Sara has lived in TAiwan most of her life till now. She knows Taiwan as her home. There is no reason she should be forced to leave.

In many countries she could apply for citizenship.

I wonder if she could, as she has been a legal resident for so long?

Maybe she doesn’t want to but wants legal resident rights (and right to work).

They should allow persons who have legally lived in Taiwan (say 8 years or so) the right to acquire citizenship without prejudice to any other citizenship they may carry. Welcome to the 21st century, where many people have mulitiple citizenships TAiwan.

I imagine if she could apply for citizenship without a demand she cancel whatever other citizenship she has, she probably will in her circumstances.

PS, her name is not Sara, it’s Krystyna. She is in a 30-second ad on the MRT where her friend says to her “Hey, Sara!” and for some reason Taipei Times thought people would actually understand what this overly complicated headline means.

I really want to know why she won’t apply for citizenship. She herself says Germany doesn’t feel like home, so why isn’t she willing to give up the passport in order to stay in Taiwan?

I support immigration reform, but I don’t think hers is the saddest tale out there of someone getting cheated by the system.

And an NIA official says she doesn’t need to be dependent on her parents for residency anymore.

She just has to become dependent on a Taiwanese employer to enjoy the privelege of an ARC…

Wow, how generous! :loco:

Yeah that was an asshole statement that one. They want to push for the rules to be changed, it’s not just about her.

[quote=“Hokwongwei”]PS, her name is not Sara, it’s Krystyna. She is in a 30-second ad on the MRT where her friend says to her “Hey, Sara!” and for some reason Taipei Times thought people would actually understand what this overly complicated headline means.

I really want to know why she won’t apply for citizenship. She herself says Germany doesn’t feel like home, so why isn’t she willing to give up the passport in order to stay in Taiwan?

I support immigration reform, but I don’t think hers is the saddest tale out there of someone getting cheated by the system.[/quote]
really?
Give up the passport? How about kids who were born here and are uncertain of whether they want to head to another country or stay with their foreign (read white) parents before they embark on a career. Why should they give up their passports. Because they are white? I have a word for that. Racist.

Giving up her passport is not fair ,
and also I don’t know if she could apply for citizenship in Taiwan immediately.
She should be able to get a permanent residency permit after spending so long in Taiwan.

Taiwan is not exactly an immigrant friendly nation. And my opinion is that Taiwanese don’t care if you call them racists unless you can make them lose face by doing so.

The only thing that might get things moving for her is if she complained to foreign media outlets, eg in Germany. That would be a big loss of face.

The only thing that might get things moving for her is if she complained to foreign media outlets, eg in Germany. That would be a big loss of face.[/quote]

Germany is hardly better when it comes to immigration: the children of permanent resident permits (equivalent of an APRC) can be German citizens as long as they give up any foreign passport by the age of 23.

Instead of complaining she should just find a job. The rules apply to everyone and it isn’t exactly news that being born in Taiwan gives you no rights to a passport or APRC.

Whatever about the passport the lack of APRC is really ridiculous.

[quote=“hsinhai78”]
Instead of complaining she should just find a job. The rules apply to everyone and it isn’t exactly news that being born in Taiwan gives you no rights to a passport or APRC.[/quote]

It has nothing to do with her being born in Taiwan; she wasn’t.

It’s just about Taiwan’s provincial-level mentality. Governed by the Chinese nationalist party, the Republic of China on Taiwan struggles to maintain international recognition or respect because of dumb rules like this.

I guess that’s how Beijing likes it. Right, Hsinhai?

anyone might think this might be simply a “historical artifact” from back in the super hate on for china days? I am pretty ignorant about it so thats a serious question.

would also add i know a few people who were born and raised here, but still cannot be citizens without giving up their citizenship (and joining military in case of males). Multiple countries, it sucks but it is what it is. some countries, developed ones, dont allow dual citizenship period.

I would get Taiwan citizenship in a heart beat seen as my entire adult life has been here, but i am sure as shit not giving up my useful passport for a green one…

[quote=“Pingdong”]
I would get Taiwan citizenship in a heart beat seen as my entire adult life has been here, but I am sure as shit not giving up my useful passport for a green one…[/quote]

She’s not even asking for citizenship, just the right to live here.

Such a simple thing, as a young woman who grew up here and wants to continue to live here without being harassed to:

fly to Hong Kong every couple of months to renew a visitor visa or

enrol in a Chinese language ‘school’ (she’s already fluent) or

sign a contract to work for a low salary for long hours and be completely dependent on the employer for her visa status or

join or start a religion to evangelize Taiwanese people to join to get a Missionary visa.

I guess, hsinhai78 might add that she could invest xxmillion dollars to start her own business. It’s only fair.

indeed her situation sucks. Taiwan is a Business, this is what happens. there are ways around it, but i agree life in Taiwan can have many discomforts. with these types of things.

I wonder though, if she couldnt go protest to immigration in person and raise all sorts of shit. if she was here that long and is fluent, she has a grasp of the culture and anyone that knows Taiwan culture knows NOTHING is set in stone, you just need to appear bigger. my initial stay was of perhaps iffy nature simply because my now wife went absolutely ape shit on immigration for being retarded with paper work. I was literally fearful standing there, but it works. Taiwan changes fast, and its relatively “easy” to make it work for you despite whatever some pdf file says.

not defending anything, im with you it sucks, but where there is a will there is a way, and Taiwan is great for that. She will need to be brown for her yelling to work though i think, or get a local friend with a piercing voice and deep scary eyes.

for some reason i thought that it had changed since i did it. still just religious/joining family/work/study/another i forgot visas happening?

American immigration suck just as much. Growing up there without paperwork is worse and nothing you do will change anything, their rules are way too rigid. At least in Taiwan if you talk to the right people things can get done, and even rules can be bent. Furthermore growing up in America actually works against you when it comes to getting a tourist/student visa or getting in on a visa wavier, because one of the criteria of getting a visa (and it is constantly abused) is proving that you will not overstay, and having prior connections or having grown up there makes proving that very difficult. It is actually easier to just break the law and stay there illegally.

What are her options? German teacher for Taiwanese? Could see actually get a job as an English teacher with a German passport?

Taiwan immi rules are the reason i am “exiled” to the USA.

:popcorn: Your situation please!

American father, Taiwanese mother. US citizenship at birth. NO TW citizenship nor available, unless I had given up US citizenship way back then. NOt willing to do so.

Not married to TW girl . Jobs hard to find in my field , etc , et al.

NOt fair that if my dad was Taiwanese and my Mom American, I wouldve had dual citizenship, but at the time of my birth that was not the case. And new laws are NOT retroactive.

My chances of relocating back to Asia now rests with having an Indonesian wife. Still doesnt help my case to live in Taiwan though, but if I did relocate, will be closer to Taiwan then San Francisco is.

May be a thought for the future.

Or maybe i can do something in China, which is even closer.

Rather the sexist application of an amendment to the Nationality Act of the ROC that does not have any positive effect on persons born before 198X.
I would be in support of cases like yours because you are half-Taiwanese. You should have priority because you have actually family ties here.