Water Quality

For some reason, I always feel the water coming out of our taps feels a tad sticky. I don’t know how else to describe the feel, but it just doesn’t feel like water in western Canada and US. Cold, hot water both have the same “stickiness” feel to them, and it’s not because my hands are sticky or dirty. I don’t know how else to really describe it but can only conclude the water is not clean. I know the water is not safe for drinking, so I am wondering if there are any knowledgeable folks here who know what the differences are in the way sewage/water is treated here than that in a city where the water is drinkable.

If there is anything to make my water more clean so it feels like good ol’ clean water, what is that thing?

Its more chlorine I believe.
And “hard” too.

I know what you mean by sticky.

[quote=“914”]For some reason, I always feel the water coming out of our taps feels a tad sticky. I don’t know how else to describe the feel, but it just doesn’t feel like water in western Canada and US. Cold, hot water both have the same “stickiness” feel to them, and it’s not because my hands are sticky or dirty. I don’t know how else to really describe it but can only conclude the water is not clean. I know the water is not safe for drinking, so I am wondering if there are any knowledgeable folks here who know what the differences are in the way sewage/water is treated here than that in a city where the water is drinkable.

If there is anything to make my water more clean so it feels like good ol’ clean water, what is that thing?[/quote]

You not want drink water from tap no problem.
Take bucket and put outside.
Every day rain too much.
Drink water from bucket.

ps. I think some silly man maybe say “Wash it!” (water your tap).

Tap water has been potable in Taipei for some time now unless your building doesn’t clean its tank properly. You should ask your building guard or manager when the tanks were last cleaned and if there are regular checkups and filter changes.

The water here is hard as lili says. Not sure if more chlorine is added.

No idea what either of you mean by sticky.

You can get attachments to the tap heads to filter out chlorine and make the water softer.

wow i had no idea that anywhere in Taiwan had potable water. Up until about 30 seconds ago i thought it was all ground water. certainly outside of city centres (and maybe 1st class resorts and such) water is mostly just view well.

I was going to make a thread a few weeks ago about this question, but maybe someone can answer ehre. Why is it that the water here is not ok to drink? I am guessing heavy metal because even boiled water you shouldnt drink (aside from in taipei as it seems).

Anyone know?

Go up to the roof top and locate the water tower/tanks . LIft lid and check for bodies. NO bodies? Water is fine then.

Believe or not, just the opposite, tap water in Taiwan is soft water! Just google the difference between soft water and hard water! Those sticky water actually is good for your skin and clothes.

The major function of water filter, which I believe the best quality ones are mostly from Germany, is soften water but not kill bacteria.

Taiwanese don’t drink tap water without boiled it because those pipes and tanks but not the water quality itself! Otherwise, old habits die hard! We have done it (boiled our drinking water) like forever!

[quote=“phyllisd”]Believe or not, just the opposite, tap water in Taiwan is soft water! Just google the difference between soft water and hard water! Those sticky water actually is good for your skin and clothes.

The major function of water filter, which I believe the best quality ones are mostly from Germany, is soften water but not kill bacteria.

Taiwanese don’t drink tap water without boiled it because those pipes and tanks but not the water quality itself! Otherwise, old habits die hard! We have done it (boiled our drinking water) like forever![/quote]
Are you Sam Wong or just copying his grammar?

[quote=“rogerthat”][quote=“phyllisd”]Believe or not, just the opposite, tap water in Taiwan is soft water! Just google the difference between soft water and hard water! Those sticky water actually is good for your skin and clothes.

The major function of water filter, which I believe the best quality ones are mostly from Germany, is soften water but not kill bacteria.

Taiwanese don’t drink tap water without boiled it because those pipes and tanks but not the water quality itself! Otherwise, old habits die hard! We have done it (boiled our drinking water) like forever![/quote]
Are you Sam Wong or just copying his grammar?[/quote]

Everybody do now.
They think funny make joking Sam speak bad English.

I think it’s possible that if someone were to tell some of you guys that your a** had just caught fire, your a** would burn to a crisp while you concentrated on the manner in which the person had given you the information.

:laughing:

This has actually happened before. I remember reading the story in the newspaper some years ago. A thief was trying to elude the police by hiding in the water tower. He got in but couldn’t get out and eventually drowned. His bloated body was discovered after people thought the water tasted “sticky.”

Right, I used to hear about bodies being dumped in water towers in Taiwan, too. Red water coming out of people’s taps, etc. Good god…

Our building is very well-maintained, so I don’t think it’s to do with our water tower.

We have a water cooler so we use that water to boil hot water.

I wonder what it is they do or do not add to the water here that makes the water feel sticky, or what processes they skip out on. When I was in high school we went on a tour of a sewage treatment plant and it was a real eye opener. Wonder if they offer tours here?! :laughing:

You’re assuming that the water texture you grew up with is standard. But water varies around the world according to the mineral content. It even varies across Taiwan.

The water bureau probably just doesn’t feel it’s necessary to employ expensive filters (or additives) for a non-existent problem. :2cents:

[quote=“phyllisd”]Believe or not, just the opposite, tap water in Taiwan is soft water! Just google the difference between soft water and hard water! Those sticky water actually is good for your skin and clothes.

The major function of water filter, which I believe the best quality ones are mostly from Germany, is soften water but not kill bacteria.

Taiwanese don’t drink tap water without boiled it because those pipes and tanks but not the water quality itself! Otherwise, old habits die hard! We have done it (boiled our drinking water) like forever![/quote]

Here you go brain-e-acts. quoted phyllisd just so you could see it twice.
as for the sticky feel, it is the salt content in the water.
Or it could just be the landlords kid messing with you.

I don’t know how skeptical you all are, but here is a statement from the Taipei Water Department.

The High Quality of Tap Water

The water supplied by TWD is definitely safe for drinking. The quality of TWD’s water supply is as good if not better than that in the advanced countries. To ensure high standards of water quality at points of use, TWD regularly takes samples of tap water from users’ premises and analyzes them at its laboratory. The lab is well equipped with sophisticated instruments and staffed with professional hands, and is the first of its kind in Taiwan to be certified by the R.O.C. Environmental Protection Agency as a qualified water examination laboratory.
TWD established its Automatic Water Quality Monitoring System in 1985 along with the initiation of the Safe Drinking Water Program. The system has enabled TWD to monitor the water quality in the raw water intakes, in the treatment process at its purification plant, and in the distribution system. Consequently, it ensures the quality of water supply and enhances TWD’s credibility.
TWD also takes water samples from all water sources, Feitsui Reservoir, treatment plants, and consumers’ premises for analysis at our well-equipped laboratory. All test data has proved that the water quality in Taipei is in good condition.
In June 1999, with the warm help of the Taipei Mass Transit Corporation, this Department put dozens of tap water drinking fountains at 39 mass transit stations in operation, as well as the first Water Quality Instant Monitoring Screen in R.O.C. at Taipei Main Station. The Department plans to make tap water potable at all public places, and wishes all residents to get used to drinking water directly from the tap.
If you live in the Taipei Metropolis and have a concern regarding your tap water, please feel free to call us. Our telephone number is 8733-5678 and we will answer your questions on the phone or make a field survey and examine the water quality for you. The service is free of charge.
To ensure the potable quality of its water supply to customers, the Taipei Water Department has set up laboratories at its Water Quality Center to perform regular testing on quality of samples taken from raw water sources, various units in the filtration process, and specific points in the distribution pipe network (such as booster stations, service reservoirs, schools, public places, metro stations, and ordinary households) and to conduct trend analyses on water quality readings.
TWD inaugurated its computerized water quality monitoring system in July 1983 to ensure healthful drinking and the stability of its water quality. The focus in the early stages was on raw water turbidity, the pH value of coagulated water, turbidity and residual chlorine of water output, as well as residual chlorine of water at over 20 specific points in Taipei City. All treatment plants were required to transmit water quality readings (including those obtained at the plants and others acquired at remote monitoring stations) to this Center via exclusive digital lines for overall monitoring and control. Thanks to constant R&D and improvement efforts by TWD’s professional staff, the system has since then witnessed successive upgrades and expansions to meet increasing requirements in different stages. Currently, the Center monitors readings of more than 520 water quality items across TWD’s service area. Chemical feeding operation has also reached a high degree of automation. In short, the system has provided TWD with comprehensive, automatic monitoring and control of water quality.

  • Water Quality Monitoring Center
  • Offices of Water Quality Monitoring Center
  • Briefing Room of Water Quality Monitoring Center
    Safe and Delicious Water

You may cast a doubtful eye on this long process of water distribution, wondering if water could be contaminated en route. However, TWD’s findings from water quality inspection at end users’ places over the years show a passing rate as high as 99.95%. Most of the failed cases can be attributed to long water retention or poor maintenance of household water facilities on the part of users. There is no need to install a purifier in private households, and a contaminated purification medium might even worsen tap water quality. All that you should do is to hire a qualified water tank/tower cleaning firm to clean your water tank and tower at least once a year
The tap water drinking fountain at a MRT station of Taipei Main Station.

The first real time Water Quality Monitoring Screen in ROC at Taipei Main Station.
The tap water drinking fountain at a MRT station of Taipei Main Station.

The first real time Water Quality Monitoring Screen in ROC at Taipei Main Station.
The tap water drinking fountain at Chunghsiao Elementary School.
The tap water drinking fountain at Zongshiao Elementary School.

Hit: 9162
Updated: 2011-11-01 11:05
Reviewed: 2011-12-14 14:36

Source: Taipei Water Department

english.twd.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem= … &mp=114012

interesting, so thats all well and fine for piped city water in Taipei city, what about the rest of the country? I rally have no idea but the amount of chemicals dumped on farmland here is really enough for me not to want to use the tap water for mcuh more than the toilet. But people here ALWAYS say dont drink the tap water, even when boiled. We have to go to special dispensaries on the road to fill up our 5gal water jugs, cheap enough, but its all mountain water (ever wonder why all these just-about-pristine mountain areas have pvc pipes all through them?

This basically ground water=bad, rain water (or mountain streams) = ok when boiled…for this reason i am thinking heavy metal…btu not sure. Anyone here actually know why?

Conditions will vary all over the island. There used to be a huge problem with arsenic in ground water in the south. There’s a museum in Tainan County dedicated to the doctor who discovered why people were getting black feet and worked to eradicate arsenic from drinking water. I guess the arsenic is still there though in the groundwater but now it’s either treated for tap water or a different source is used.

Kaohsiung only got potable water a few years back but I still wouldn’t trust it all that much. I have been upstream of where Taipei gets its water and it is a clean mountainous area. Ktown is more open.

[quote=“Pingdong”]interesting, so thats all well and fine for piped city water in Taipei city, what about the rest of the country? I rally have no idea but the amount of chemicals dumped on farmland here is really enough for me not to want to use the tap water for mcuh more than the toilet. But people here ALWAYS say dont drink the tap water, even when boiled. We have to go to special dispensaries on the road to fill up our 5gal water jugs, cheap enough, but its all mountain water (ever wonder why all these just-about-pristine mountain areas have pvc pipes all through them?

This basically ground water=bad, rain water (or mountain streams) = ok when boiled…for this reason I am thinking heavy metal…btu not sure. Anyone here actually know why?[/quote]

My in-laws live in Pingtung and Gangshan and either boil their water or filter then boil. While I only ever drank that “processed” water, I brushed my teeth with water from the tap and never got even the slightest bit sick. Regardless, my wife bought a filter for us here in Tainan and we continue to filter then boil. Seems an awful waste of energy to me.

It always seemed to me that the point of filtering was to kill bacteria, which a modern filter will definitely accomplish anyway. So boiling after filtering is pointless. Or am I wrong?