Has the Taiwan government gone too far with its coronavirus measures?

There have been a bunch of articles recently, like the one below, criticizing Taiwan’s “draconian” and “invasive” measures. What is so bad about connecting NHI with travel history? I don’t get that one. Actually, I have conflicting feelings and just don’t know enough to make up my mind about any of them.
I thought it would get buried under all the other posts in the Taiwan Coronavirus development thread and given the possible long-term implications I think this is a debate worth having.

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It’s actually happening in a bunch of countries:

Methinks it’s just news outlet running out of things to say about the coronavirus, so trying to attack every other possible angle.

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Yeah they’ve gone way too far. That’s why two dead in three months and we’re not in lock down. What a Faustian pact we have made with our masters.

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Big data is here, how it is used can be for bad or good. I am not worried about this use of it.

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Not concerned at all in this case.

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I think they’re not doing enough. There was an article recently that a quarantined person was caught on a scooter. The cop who pulled her over just happened to check her plate and found it belonged to a person under home quarantine. If that’s how one person was caught, how many aren’t caught?
I know someone who works in a tech company making quasi-spy stuff for countries that heavily monitor the populace, camera’s with facial recognition in police cars and similar things. I don’t know if Taiwan has that kind or tech or would use it. I suppose it’s possible to auto-scan every licence plate and get a notification of every one that’s flagged. But the majority of people don’t move in their own vehicles. I think I heard Hong Kong is putting tracking devices on people. Monitoring cellphone data isn’t worth much. Someone can run to 7 without their phone. There was a report that Russia is monitoring the home quarantined by CCTV. I think I could slip by that easily enough. Even if facial recognition were used, it is of limited use when everyone is wearing a mask.

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Cant agree more. I tell my friends back in Australia of what life is like in Taiwan at present and they wish they could come (they cant though, as they are not allowed to leave OZ). I would rather be here than most other places in the world.

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How about the HSR? Automatic temperature check. If you fail the doors don’t open.

They’re not going far enough when it comes to the arseholes traveling abroad and coming back.

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I am satisfied with the decisions the Taiwanese government has made in response to the pandemic.

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I keep meaning to take my temperature after exercising and see if there’s a difference. And with the heat and humidity starting to kick in … “Yes, I KNOW I’ve got a lot of sweat on my face, but I’m trying not to touch my face, so I can’t wipe it off!” Drip, drip.

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Well apparently there aren’t any libertarians here. Many would argue government shouldn’t fine you 1 million for just walking out when you haven’t done anything wrong.
We need to be vigilant. Nothing good has ever come out of trusting a government to do the right thing.

Yeah this is definitely one of the most intrusive uses so far but big data is just starting and there’s no stopping it. How though? how do you make sure the government doesn’t abuse these powers? very hard to enforce any form of oversight on this.

Just read the BBC article. How dramatic! Even the dog! Millennial self-importance. The student, not the dog.
I’m glad Taiwan is doing this, but it’s still not enough. Calling twice a day is good, but no assurance. There are apps to forward calls over the internet. Cell tracking is only useful if a person travels significant distances. I could get to several stores without going out of range.

I’ve been thinking about this a bit recently, particularly regarding the fact that countries can block their citizens from exiting the country. Don’t know why but that one got me pondering where do rights stop and end.

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Taiwan has just revised its GDP growth forecast for this year down .5% to just under 2%. How does that compare with countries that failed to take measures early enough and go into lockdown? USA are talking about a 30% drop I believe.

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I will give you guys a concept note on this: https://imgur.com/a/XaQQ38Q

The actual electronic/digital fence system enacted is much more powerful and can be abused.

One of the measures the UK have added is only one doctor now can get someone forcibly sectioned for mental health issues. Why not keep it at two? It’s an easy way to shut people up and doesn’t appear to have much impact on COVID-19.

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Libertarianism would lead to a collapse in times like this. The law is don’t go out. If they go out, they did something wrong. Simples. Look at the countries that didn’t interfere in their citizen’s freedom. It got bad, then they did what Taiwan did first, and more. There are rules in place for when rules are implemented. And laws about what to do when the government breaks rules, and courts to decide where the limits are. And a free and vigorous press to tell people who to be mad at. This isn’t China, and if it was, what could you do rather than wish you were elsewhere.

That’s a big leap in logic. Maybe it’s to free up doctors for where they’re needed. NHS has enough to worry about without getting multiple lawsuits from people sanctioned for complaining. They’re asking retired professionals to go back into service and for other people to volunteer so the service won’t collapse.

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I’m not sure what my big leap in logic was. I was replying to a question about human rights. Freeing up a psychiatrist might help against a virus.

Human rights in such circumstances is a tricky issue. Authoritarianism would be most effective in stopping spread. Where to find the balance is a problem.

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