The versatility of the 🍌 word


#1

@jesus80

He’s :banana:ed. = He’s doomed.
He :banana:ed up. = He made a mistake.
He’s :banana:ed up. = He’s crazy/terrible.

And incidentally…

He’s bananas. = He’s crazy (without the terrible connotation).


#2

You forgot “He’s a fuck-up.” :sunglasses:


#3

Weakness in its users’ word power signals a language has become senile and lethargic.


#4

Instead of 50 words for snow, we have fuck words for everything.


#5

No kidding. It shows up even in 7fuck11, Starfucks, …


#6

The most versatile word in the English language.


#7

1:43 Speakers of English know where to put fucking in the word.


#8

And “he fucked him up”

(He beat him up)


#9

It’s fucked up that he would fuck him up like that. What a fuck-up.


#10

I just came back from the fucking hospital. Ed has been there since he was fucked up by that fucking fuck-up, Joey Joyless. Ed is really fucked up now. Can’t even eat solid food. And he’s also fucked since he can’t afford the medical bills. Fucking hell…


#11

Sounds like a total clusterfuck.


#12

So much for polite euphemisms. :roll:

(I wasn’t trying to build a catalog, just explaining something to J-Man after questionable usage in another thread.)


#13

There’s a whole book on this:


#14

Fuck this thread and the horse it rode in on. :grin:


#15

I’m hearing this in George Carlin’s NY accent for some reason


#16

Also for the Aussies/Brits

:banana:en = point of emphasis, like a “very” or a “really”

I’m :banana:en drunk
He’s a :banana:en good bloke
Today’s :banana:en hot


#17

Same in American English with slightly different spelling.


#18

I thought they spelled it “facken” in the UK.

“Get off yer fackin’ arse, Ronnie!!”


#19

I just know the Scottish spell it “fookin.”


#20

Whale oil beef hooked!

(say it quickly)